Worst Pills, Best Pills

An expert, independent second opinion on more than 1,800 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, and supplements

diphenhydramine (BENADRYL, DYTAN SUSPENSION, DYTAN-D SUSPENSION, SOMINEX FORMULA)


E-ALERTS

Search results below include E-Alerts where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion.


DISEASE AND DRUG FAMILY INFORMATION

Search results below include Disease and Drug Family Information where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion.

Allergy and Hayfever
If you suffer from an itchy and runny nose, watery eyes, sneezing, and a tickle in the back of your throat, then you probably have an allergy. An allergy means a hypersensitivity to a particular substance called an allergen. Hypersensitivity means that the body’s immune system, which defends against infection, disease, and foreign bodies, reacts inappropriately to the allergen. Examples of common allergens are pollen, mold, ragweed, dust, feathers, cat hair, makeup, walnuts, aspirin, shellfish, poison ivy, and chocolate.
Cough and Cold
Many prescription or over-the-counter drug combinations of two or more ingredients should not be used because they are irrational combinations of single ingredients, some of which are safe and effective and sensible to use alone if treating the symptom for which they are intended. The combinations, however, present extra risks for extra ingredients that will usually not add any benefit (possibly a risk) to the first ingredient and will invariably cost much more than the single ingredient alone.

DRUG AND DIETARY SUPPLEMENT PROFILES

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion.


WORST PILLS, BEST PILLS NEWSLETTER ARTICLES

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion.

Highlights of the New Guidelines for Severe Allergic Reaction
November 2020
We review new guidelines for treating life-threatening allergic reactions (known as anaphylaxis) recently issued by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.
Driving Under the Influence Caused by Medications
September 2020
Although impaired driving usu¬ally is caused by alcohol or marijuana, many commonly used prescription and over-the-counter medications also can impair one’s ability to drive safely. Learn about several classes of medications that can cause this serious problem to protect yourself, your passengers and others who share the road with you.
Allergists’ Group Recommends Newer Antihistamines Over Older Antihistamines for Nasal Allergies and Hives
August 2020
Because of the better safety profile of newer second- and third-generation antihistamines, Public Citizen’s Health Research Group has previously recommended their use over older first-generation antihistamines for both allergic rhinitis and urticaria. A recent position statement by the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology that summarized the research evidence about these drugs reinforces our recommendation.
Drug-Induced Restless Legs Syndrome
March 2019
Restless legs syndrome is a common neurological movement and sensory disorder that affects 5 to 10 percent of the population. In this article, we identify some of the many drugs that can cause or worsen this disorder.
Drugs That Cause Weight Gain
December 2017
Weight gain is an adverse event associated with many widely used medications and may lead to significant overweight and obesity, especially in susceptible individuals. Find out which drugs have this adverse effect.
Drugs That Cause Sun-Related Skin Reactions
July 2016
Summer is a terrific time for healthy outdoor activities, such as walking, hiking, biking and swim¬ming. But for an unlucky few, certain medications can lead to adverse skin reactions following exposure to the sun. Find out whether you are at risk and how to protect yourself.
Another Look at First-Generation Antihistamines
May 2016
Last month, we discussed the risks and benefits of second- and third-generation antihistamines for treatment of nasal allergies. In this second of a two-part series, we explain why first-generation or "sedating" antihistamines are not a safe option for managing nasal allergies.
Treatment for Nasal Allergies: An Updated Review
April 2016
With spring time pollen counts soaring, many patients with seasonal nasal allergies will be looking for relief from allergy medications. Learn the best available treatments to stay safe and relatively symptom-free during allergy season and throughout the year.
Anticholinergics May Increase Dementia Risk in Elderly
August 2015
Learn about recent evidence suggesting that anticholinergic drugs — which include many antidepressants, antihistamines and overactive bladder control medications — may increase the risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia in the elderly.
New Study Reveals Many Patients at Risk for Dangerous Alcohol-Drug Interactions
July 2015
Recent research revealed that many patients consume alcohol while using drugs that may can cause dangerous side effects when combined with alcohol. Read this article to learn about the many ways alcohol can adversely interact with prescription and over-the-counter medications.
Inappropriate Prescribing of Medicines in the Elderly: A Persistent Problem
March 2013
Approximately 20 percent of prescriptions for elderly patients in primary care settings are inappropriate, leading to adverse reactions that are entirely preventable. The article lists some of the most common inappropriately prescribed drugs.
Update on Grapefruit Juice-Drug Interactions
July 2012
This article updates and expands our earlier list of drugs that can have harmful interactions with grapefruit juice. The list now includes 82 different drugs.
Preventing Heat-Induced Death and Illness
June 2012
This article lists practical steps to take to avoid death, hospitalization or other medical problems caused by heat stress. It also contains a list of 123 drugs that can impair your response to heat.
Benefits and Risks of Popular Allergy Medications
April 2012
This article discusses drugs you should and should not use as the allergy season commences.
Quality of Drug Prescribing
March 2011
The article reviews a study on the potentially dangerous, inappropriate prescribing of 77 drugs that pose a high risk to older adults. Of the 67 of these drugs that we had previously reviewed in Worst, Pills, Best Pills News, we had classified 60 (90 percent) of them as “Do Not Use,” and the other seven as "Limited Use."
Aripiprazole (ABILIFY) Drug Interactions
April 2010
The article lists 53 drugs that can interact with the psychiatric drug ABILIFY to either increase the amount in the body, which can lead to toxicity, or decrease the amount rendering the drug less effective.
Alpha-Blockers for Prostate Enlargement: Some Important Drug Interactions
June 2009
Taking alpha-blockers in combination with drugs for erectile dysfunction and with other drugs can cause dizziness and fainting. In this article we will discuss alfuzosin (UROXATRAL), doxazosin (CARDURA), tamsulosin (FLOMAX) and terazosin (HYTRIN) and drugs with which they can have harmful interactions.
Tizanidine: Watch Out for Drugs Interacting With This Muscle Relaxant
October 2008
Tizanidine (ZANAFLEX) is a muscle relaxant for which more than 3.8 million prescriptions were filled in the U.S. last year. The article lists more than 64 drugs with which it can have dangerous interactions resulting in excess sedation, difficulty breathing or dangerously low blood pressure that can result in falling.
Dextromethorphan (DELSYM or generic) Or Diphenhydramine (BENADRYL or generic) Ineffective For Nighttime Cough In Children
August 2004
Neither dextromethorphan or diphenhydramine is effective and each has its own risks.
New Warning For OTC Drugs Containing the Antihistamine Diphenhydramine (BENADRYL)
February 2003
On December 5, 2002, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that a new warning statement would be required on the labels of all over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamine, anti-nausea, anti-cough and nighttime sleep-aid drug products containing diphenhydramine citrate or diphenhydramine hydrochloride. The statement advises consumers not to use oral OTC diphenhydramine products with any other product also containing diphenhydramine, including products used on the skin (topically).Article lists products.
Drug Induced Psychiatric Symptoms
October 2002
This is the first of a two part series on drug induced psychiatric symptoms that is based on the July 8, 2002 issue of The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics. Regular readers of Worst Pills, Best Pills News will recognize The Medical Letter as a reference source written for physicians and pharmacists that we often use because of its reputation as an objective and independent source of drug information. The article lists the drugs and their psychiatric adverse effects.
Grapefruit Juice and Drug Interactions
June 2002
Grapefruit juice can interact with a number of therapeutically important drugs that could lead to the possibility of toxicity. These drugs are listed in the article.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FROM PUBLIC CITIZEN

Search results below include Additional Information from Public Citizen where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion.

FDA Neglecting Its Responsibility to Protect Children From Risky, Ineffective Cough and Cold Medicines
By simply warning parents not to administer over-the-counter cough and cold remedies to children under the age of 2, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has failed to properly address the glaring risks presented by this category of drugs, Public Citizen said today.
Children Under 12 Should Not Be Given Cough, Cold Medications, Public Citizen Tells FDA
Children under the age of 12 should not be given over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicines, and remedies aimed specifically at children should be removed from the U.S. market, Public Citizen said today in testimony before the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).