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Drug Profile

Do NOT stop taking this or any drug without the advice of your physician. Some drugs can cause severe adverse effects when they are stopped suddenly.

Do Not Use [what does this mean?]
Generic drug name: atropine, hyoscyamine, methenamine, methylene blue, phenyl salicylate and benzoic acid (A TROE peen, hye oh SYE a meen, meth EN a meen, METH i leen blew, FEN ill sa LI si late, ben ZOE ik A sid)
Brand name(s): URISED
GENERIC: not available FAMILIES: Other Drugs for Bacterial Infection, Drugs for Spasticity, Salicylates
Find the drug label by searching at DailyMed.

Safety Warnings For This Drug [top]

Product Warnings

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before use if you are taking antibiotics.

When using this product, tiredness, drowsiness or dizziness may occur. Be careful driving or operating machinery.

Stop using and ask a doctor if symptoms get worse, diarrhea lasts more than two days or you get abdominal swelling or bulging. These may be signs of a serious condition.

If pregnant or breast-feeding, ask a health care professional before use.

Older adults are especially sensitive to the harmful anticholinergic effects of this drug. Drugs in this family should not be used unless absolutely necessary.

Mental Effects: confusion, delirium, short-term memory problems, disorientation and impaired attention.

Physical Effects: dry mouth, constipation, difficulty urinating (especially for a man with an enlarged prostate), blurred vision, decreased sweating with increased body temperature, sexual dysfunction and worsening of glaucoma.

Facts About This Drug [top]

This combination of six drugs, atropine, hyoscyamine, methenamine, methylene blue, phenyl salicylate, and benzoic acid, is used to treat symptoms of urinary tract infections. This combination of drugs is irrational and too complex, and it should not be used. Part of the problem is that because the dosage of each individual drug is fixed, your doctor cannot adjust dosages to ensure that the product will be safe and effective. And one drug in this combination, atropine, causes adverse...

This combination of six drugs, atropine, hyoscyamine, methenamine, methylene blue, phenyl salicylate, and benzoic acid, is used to treat symptoms of urinary tract infections. This combination of drugs is irrational and too complex, and it should not be used. Part of the problem is that because the dosage of each individual drug is fixed, your doctor cannot adjust dosages to ensure that the product will be safe and effective. And one drug in this combination, atropine, causes adverse effects so severe that people over 60 should not take it at all.

Some of the ingredients in this product may cause excitement, agitation, drowsiness, or confusion in older adults, even at the usual dose. Call your doctor if you have any of these symptoms. Also, in people over 40, this drug may cause glaucoma, an eye disease that often remains hidden.

Practice measures to prevent urinary tract infections. Drink plenty of fluids, especially water. While cranberry juice is unreliable as a cure for urinary tract infections, the juice may reduce odor from incontinence.[1] Practice meticulous hygiene. After using the toilet, wipe backward, not forward, then wash your hands. Prepare and store foods properly, especially when traveling, to prevent diarrhea. Restrict caffeine, which widens the urethra. Indwelling catheters invite urinary tract infections. However, unless there are symptoms of urinary infection, it is not always necessary to take medication just because bacteria are found in a urine test.[2] Women are particularly prone to repeated urinary tract infections. If urinary tract symptoms occur often, ask your doctor about keeping a supply of medication on hand. Ideally, the antibiotic you use should be the most effective, least toxic, and least costly.[3],[4]

last reviewed October 31, 2020