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Drug Profile

Do NOT stop taking this or any drug without the advice of your physician. Some drugs can cause severe adverse effects when they are stopped suddenly.

Do Not Use [what does this mean?]
Generic drug name: trimethobenzamide (trye meth oh BEN za mide)
Brand name(s): TIGAN
GENERIC: not available FAMILY: Drugs for Nausea
Find the drug label by searching at DailyMed.

Alternative Treatment [top]

See dietary modifications box below.

Safety Warnings For This Drug [top]

Product Warnings

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before use if you are taking antibiotics.

When using this product, tiredness, drowsiness or dizziness may occur. Be careful driving or operating machinery.

Stop using and ask a doctor if symptoms get worse, diarrhea lasts more than two days or you get abdominal swelling or bulging. These may be signs of a serious condition.

If pregnant or breast-feeding, ask a health care professional before use.

Older adults are especially sensitive to the harmful anticholinergic effects of this drug. Drugs in this family should not be used unless absolutely necessary.

Mental Effects: confusion, delirium, short-term memory problems, disorientation and impaired attention.

Physical Effects: dry mouth, constipation, difficulty urinating (especially for a man with an enlarged prostate), blurred vision, decreased sweating with increased body temperature, sexual dysfunction and worsening of glaucoma.

Drugs used to treat cancer often cause severe nausea and vomiting, either immediately after the drug is taken or several hours later. You can treat this kind of nausea and vomiting by changing your diet or by taking an antinausea drug. You should always try dietary changes first.

  • Eat small, frequent meals so that your stomach is never empty.
  • When you get up from sleeping or resting, eat some dry crackers or toast before you start being active.
  • Drink carbonated drinks or other clear liquids such as soups and gelatin.
  • Eat tart foods such as lemons and pickles.
  • Do not eat foods with strong smells.

Facts About This Drug [top]

Trimethobenzamide (TIGAN) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to relieve nausea and vomiting associated with surgery and gastroenteritis. There is no convincing proof that it is effective.[1] It has little or no value for preventing or treating vertigo (a form of dizziness) or motion sickness.[2]

The dose of trimethobenzamide should be closely monitored in elderly patients, who often have impaired renal (kidney) function, and in patients with renal disease because much of...

Trimethobenzamide (TIGAN) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to relieve nausea and vomiting associated with surgery and gastroenteritis. There is no convincing proof that it is effective.[1] It has little or no value for preventing or treating vertigo (a form of dizziness) or motion sickness.[2]

The dose of trimethobenzamide should be closely monitored in elderly patients, who often have impaired renal (kidney) function, and in patients with renal disease because much of the drug in excreted and eliminated via the kidneys.[3]

Side effects

Trimethobenzamide can hide some of the signs of an aspirin or salicylate overdose.[4]

Rarely, trimethobenzamide causes convulsions; this is more common among older users.[2]

Trimethobenzamide may cause movement disorders known as extrapyramidal symptoms. Muscular spasm, especially in the head and neck, and Parkinson-like symptoms, such as tremors, may occur.[5]

Some of the drug’s hazards are magnified in children, in whom it should not be used for uncomplicated vomiting.[4]

Regulatory actions surrounding trimethobenzamide

2007: In 2007 the FDA issued an advisory warning that companies must stop manufacturing and distributing unapproved suppository drug products containing trimethobenzamide hydrochloride. Drugs containing trimethobenzamide in suppository form lack evidence of effectiveness. This action does not affect oral capsules and injectable products.[6]

2008: In 2008 the patient package insert of trimethobenzamide was revised in reference to the cautionary statement regarding renal disease with trimethobenzamide use in elderly patients and in patients with renal disease.[7]

last reviewed March 31, 2021