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Drug Profile

Do NOT stop taking this or any drug without the advice of your physician. Some drugs can cause severe adverse effects when they are stopped suddenly.

Do Not Use [what does this mean?]
Generic drug name: oxtriphylline (ox TRYE fi lin)
Brand name(s): CHOLEDYL SA
GENERIC: not available FAMILY: Xanthines
Find the drug label by searching at DailyMed.

Alternative Treatment [top]

Safety Warnings For This Drug [top]

Do not stop any asthma medication without first consulting your physician. Abruptly stopping a medication may result in acutely deteriorating asthma control.

Additional Precautions for Asthma

Avoid exposure to things that trigger your allergies or asthma, such as animals, bedding, chemicals, cosmetics, drugs, dust, mold, foods, pollens, or smoke. Wearing a mask reduces inhalation of drugs, pollens, and smoke.

Aspirin can trigger asthma in people who are aspirin-allergic, as can beta-blockers. Infections aggravate lung problems. During epidemics of respiratory illnesses, avoid crowded places and wash your hands frequently to help prevent infection. If you have asthma, get a flu vaccination.

Note: The information in this profile addresses the care of asthma that is not serious enough to need emergency treatment.

Facts About This Drug [top]

Oxtriphylline is used to treat symptoms of chronic asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema. It opens airways in the lungs and increases the flow of air through them, making breathing easier. Oxtriphylline is identical to theophylline, except that it contains a salt not found in theophylline. It is no more effective than theophylline, yet it costs more.[1] If you take oxtriphylline, ask your doctor to change your prescription to theophylline.

If you continue to use oxtriphylline, take it exactly...

Oxtriphylline is used to treat symptoms of chronic asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema. It opens airways in the lungs and increases the flow of air through them, making breathing easier. Oxtriphylline is identical to theophylline, except that it contains a salt not found in theophylline. It is no more effective than theophylline, yet it costs more.[1] If you take oxtriphylline, ask your doctor to change your prescription to theophylline.

If you continue to use oxtriphylline, take it exactly as prescribed. Because there is a narrow range between a helpful and a harmful amount of this drug in your body, your doctor must monitor your dose and the level of the drug in your bloodstream. Too little oxtriphylline may bring on an asthma attack; too much can lead to an overdose. The more serious signs of an overdose include seizures, irregular heart rhythms, and pounding heartbeat. Less severe signs may or may not appear before the serious ones.[2]

last reviewed February 28, 2021