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Drug Profile

The information on this site is intended to supplement and enhance, not replace, the advice of a physician who is familiar with your medical history. Decisions about your health should always be made ONLY after detailed conversation with your doctor.

Generic drug name: thiamine [vitamin b1] (THYE a min)
Brand name(s):
GENERIC: available FAMILY: Vitamins
Find the drug label by searching at DailyMed.

Pregnancy and Breast-feeding Warnings [top]

Vitamins taken at the level that supplies normal body needs (not megadoses) do not pose a risk to the fetus or the nursing infant.

Facts About This Drug [top]

 

...
FOODS HIGH IN THIAMINE (VITAMIN B1)
Meats (especially pork); organ meats; and nuts (all of which are high in cholesterol and/or fat); dried beans; peas; whole-grain or enriched breads and cereals; enriched or brown rice; enriched pasta, noodles, and other flour products; potatoes.  Cooking destroys some thiamine.
1 loin chop 1.18 milligrams thiamine
1 ounce wheat germ 0.56 milligram thiamine
3½ounces roast pork

 

FOODS HIGH IN THIAMINE (VITAMIN B1)
Meats (especially pork); organ meats; and nuts (all of which are high in cholesterol and/or fat); dried beans; peas; whole-grain or enriched breads and cereals; enriched or brown rice; enriched pasta, noodles, and other flour products; potatoes.  Cooking destroys some thiamine.
1 loin chop 1.18 milligrams thiamine
1 ounce wheat germ 0.56 milligram thiamine
3½ounces roast pork 0.39 milligram thiamine

Thiamine, or vitamin B1, helps the body use sugars and starches (carbohydrates) effectively. It is available in several kinds of foods (see box above), and a well-balanced diet with a variety of healthful foods should supply all the thiamine that your body needs. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of thiamine is 1.2 milligrams per day for men over the age of 50 and 1.1 milligrams per day for women over the age of 50.

The signs of thiamine deficiency include loss of feeling on areas of the hands and feet, decreased muscle strength, personality disturbances, depression, lack of initiative, and poor memory. Thiamine deficiency is most commonly seen in alcoholics (the condition caused by a severe deficiency is called beri-beri). Alcoholics can become thiamine deficient because their diets often do not provide enough thiamine and because alcohol hinders the absorption of what thiamine they have. Chronic diarrhea can also lead to a need for more thiamine.

Thiamine is effective for treating conditions resulting from a thiamine deficiency, as in alcoholism. It has not been proven effective for treating skin problems, persistent diarrhea, fatigue, mental disorders, multiple sclerosis, ulcerative colitis, or for use as an insect repellant or appetite stimulant.[1]

If you have to increase your intake of thiamine, eat more thiamine-rich foods rather than taking a vitamin supplement. You should take a supplement only when dietary changes are inadequate to treat a deficiency.

If you take thiamine supplements without a doctor’s supervision, do not take more than the RDA. Excess thiamine, beyond what is needed each day, simply passes through you and is eliminated in the urine without being used by your body.

Before You Use This Drug [top]

8Tell your doctor if you have or have had:

  • allergy to thiamine
  • pregnancy or are breast-feeding
  • thiamine deficiency that has resulted in a brain disorder

Tell your doctor about any other drugs you take, including aspirin, herbs, vitamins, and other nonprescription products.

How to Use This Drug [top]

  • If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember, but skip it if it is almost time for the next dose. Do not take double doses.
  • Do not share your medication with others.
  • Take the drug at the same time(s) each day.
  • Store at room temperature with lid on tightly. Do not store in the bathroom. Do not expose to heat, moisture, or strong light. Keep out of reach of children.

Interactions with Other Drugs [top]

Evaluations of Drug Interactions 2003 lists no drugs, biologics (e.g., vaccines, therapeutic antibodies), or foods as causing “highly clinically significant” or “clinically significant” interactions when used together with the drugs in this section. We also found no interactions in the drugs’ FDA-approved professional package inserts. However, as the number of new drugs approved for marketing increases and as more experience is gained with these drugs over time, new interactions may be discovered.

Adverse Effects [top]

Call your doctor immediately if you experience:

  • coughing
  • difficulty swallowing
  • hives
  • skin itching
  • swelling of face, lips, or eyelids
  • wheezing or breathing difficulty

last reviewed May 31, 2021