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Drug Profile

The information on this site is intended to supplement and enhance, not replace, the advice of a physician who is familiar with your medical history. Decisions about your health should always be made ONLY after detailed conversation with your doctor.

Generic drug name: olopatadine (oh loe pa TA deen)
Brand name(s): PATADAY, PATANASE, PATANOL, PAZEO
GENERIC: not available FAMILY: Antihistamines
Find the drug label by searching at DailyMed.

Pregnancy and Breast-feeding Warnings [top]

Pregnancy Warning

Olopatadine caused an increase in fetal deaths in animal studies. Use during pregnancy only for clear medical reasons. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant before you take this drug.

Breast-feeding Warning

Olopatadine was excreted in human milk. Because of the potential for adverse effects in the nursing infant, you should consult with your doctor if you are planning to nurse.

Facts About This Drug [top]

Olopatadine is an eye drop used to treat allergies that affect the eye. Olopatadine works in two ways. First, it blocks the action of the allergy-causing chemical histamine, and is therefore classified as an antihistamine. Also, it prevents mast cells (the body’s allergy-mediating cells) from releasing histamine.[1]

Alcon Laboratories of Fort Worth, Texas, manufacturer of Patanol, claims that its product olopatadine is superior to cromolyn (GASTROCOM), pemirolast (ALAMAST), and nedocromil...

Olopatadine is an eye drop used to treat allergies that affect the eye. Olopatadine works in two ways. First, it blocks the action of the allergy-causing chemical histamine, and is therefore classified as an antihistamine. Also, it prevents mast cells (the body’s allergy-mediating cells) from releasing histamine.[1]

Alcon Laboratories of Fort Worth, Texas, manufacturer of Patanol, claims that its product olopatadine is superior to cromolyn (GASTROCOM), pemirolast (ALAMAST), and nedocromil (ALOCRIL) in inhibiting release of histamine from mast cells.[2]

The company alleges that clinically, olopatadine provides more effective relief from itching than nedocromil[3] and ketotifen (ZADITOR).[4]
These claims have not been independently verified by the FDA and Alcon therefore cannot legally use the results of these studies in their advertising for olopatadine.

Olopatadine’s manufacturer states that 7% of users describe headache when using this drug.[1]

Before You Use This Drug [top]

Do not use if you have or have had:

  • allergy to olopatadine

Tell your doctor if you have or have had:

  • pregnancy or are breast-feeding
  • allergy to benzalkonium

When You Use This Drug [top]

  • Check with your doctor if symptoms do not improve or if condition worsens.

Tell your doctor about any other drugs you take, including aspirin, herbs, vitamins, and other nonprescription products.

How to Use This Drug [top]

  • Follow directions for applying drops.
  • Prevent the container from becoming contaminated. Avoid letting the tip of the container touch your eye, hands, or any other object.
  • Contact lenses should be removed prior to administration of this drug. This drug may be absorbed by soft contact lenses. Wait at least 15 minutes after using olopatadine before putting in contact lenses.
  • If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember, but skip it if it is almost time for the next dose. Do not take double doses.
  • Do not share your medication with others.
  • Take the drug at the same time(s) each day.
  • Store at room temperature with lid on tightly. Do not store in the bathroom. Do not expose to heat, moisture, or strong light. Keep out of reach of children.

Interactions with Other Drugs [top]

Evaluations of Drug Interactions 2003 lists no drugs, biologics (e.g., vaccines, therapeutic antibodies), or foods as causing “highly clinically significant” or “clinically significant” interactions when used together with the drugs in this section. We also found no interactions in the drugs’ FDA-approved professional package inserts. However, as the number of new drugs approved for marketing increases and as more experience is gained with these drugs over time, new interactions may be discovered.

Adverse Effects [top]

Call your doctor if these symptoms continue:

  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • headache
  • burning, dryness, itching, or stinging of the eye
  • change in sense of taste
  • cold symptoms
  • feeling of something in the eye
  • redness of eye or inside of eyelid
  • eye irritation or pain
  • eyelid swelling
  • sore throat
  • stuffy or runny nose

last reviewed January 31, 2021