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Drug Profile

The information on this site is intended to supplement and enhance, not replace, the advice of a physician who is familiar with your medical history. Decisions about your health should always be made ONLY after detailed conversation with your doctor.

Generic drug name: moxifloxacin [eye drops] (mox ee FLOKS a sin)
Brand name(s): VIGAMOX
GENERIC: not available FAMILIES: Infection, Fluoroquinolones
Find the drug label by searching at DailyMed.

Generic drug name: ofloxacin [eye] (oh FLOKS a sin)
Brand name(s): OCUFLOX
GENERIC: not available FAMILIES: Infection, Fluoroquinolones
Find the drug label by searching at DailyMed.

Pregnancy and Breast-feeding Warnings [top]

Pregnancy Warning

Ofloxacin and moxifloxacin caused fetal harm in animal studies, including decreased fetal body weight and increased death when given by mouth. Because of the potential for serious adverse effects to the fetus, these drugs should not be used by pregnant women unless there is no safer substitute.

Breast-feeding Warning

These drugs are excreted in human milk. Because of the potential for serious adverse effects in nursing infants, you should not take these drugs while nursing.

Safety Warnings For This Drug [top]

Prolonged use of any antimicrobial may result in the overgrowth of nonsusceptible organisms, including fungi.

Facts About This Drug [top]

Ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, is formulated as an eye drop and ointment for the treatment of eye infections, including conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers. Moxifloxacin, also a fluoroquinolone, is formulated only as an eye drop and is used for the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis.

Ofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, is formulated as an eye drop and ointment for the treatment of eye infections, including conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers. Moxifloxacin, also a fluoroquinolone, is formulated only as an eye drop and is used for the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis.

Before You Use This Drug [top]

Do not use if you have or have had:

  • allergy to ofloxacin, other fluoroquinolones, or any component to this medicine

Tell your doctor if you have or have had:

  • pregnancy or are breast-feeding

Tell your doctor about any other drugs you take, including aspirin, herbs, vitamins, and other nonprescription products.

When You Use This Drug [top]

  • Stop using the drug at the first sign of a rash or an allergic reaction.
  • Your eyes may sting or burn just after using. Call your doctor if this problem does not go away in a few days.
  • Your vision may become blurry after application of the eye ointment.
  • Your eyes may become sensitive to bright light. Wear sunglasses and avoid prolonged exposure to bright light.
  • Do not wear your contact lenses while using the drug.
  • Call your doctor if your eye infection does not improve within seven days or if it gets worse.
  • Use all the ofloxacin your doctor prescribed, even if you feel better before you finish. If you stop too soon, your symptoms could come back.

How to Use This Drug [top]

  • Follow the instructions for applying eye drops correctly so that you won’t absorb the drug into your body and possibly suffer serious adverse effects.
  • If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember, but skip it if it is almost time for the next dose. Do not take double doses.
  • Do not share your medication with others.
  • Take the drug at the same time(s) each day.
  • Store at room temperature with lid on tightly. Do not store in the bathroom. Do not expose to heat, moisture, or strong light. Keep out of reach of children.
  • Do not let the ointment or liquid form freeze.

Interactions with Other Drugs [top]

Although there are potential drug interactions reported with the other forms of the drug, there have been no “highly clinically significant” or “clinically significant” drug interactions reported with the ocular form of ofloxacin in Evaluations of Drug Interactions 2003. We also found no interactions in the drugs’ FDA-approved professional package inserts. However, as the number of new drugs approved for marketing increases and as more experience is gained with these drugs over time, new interactions may be discovered.

Adverse Effects [top]

Call your doctor immediately if you experience:

  • difficulty breathing
  • chest pain
  • difficulty swallowing
  • dizziness
  • itching, rash, or hives
  • swelling or puffiness of eye, lips, or face
  • tightness in chest or wheezing

Call your doctor if these symptoms continue:

  • blurred vision
  • burning of eye
  • dryness of eye
  • eye pain
  • feeling of something in the eye
  • increased sensitivity of eye to light
  • redness, irritation, or itching of eye, eyelid, or inner lining of eyelid
  • tearing of eye

last reviewed January 31, 2021