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lisinopril (PRINIVIL, QBRELIS, ZESTRIL)


E-ALERTS

Search results below include E-Alerts where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion.


DISEASE AND DRUG FAMILY INFORMATION

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High Blood Pressure
A study of nutritional therapy showed that over one-third of people who previously needed drug treatment for high blood pressure were able to adequately control their blood pressure with nutritional therapy alone.Several factors should be taken into account when considering whether your high blood pressure should be treated. One is the benefits of the treatment for your blood pressure, which vary significantly depending on how high it is, your age, and whether you have other risk factors such as high cholesterol or are a smoker or a diabetic, and whether you have had a heart attack, heart failure, a stroke, or have kidney damage. The other consideration is the risks or the adverse effects of the treatment, which will vary depending on what is being considered.

DRUG AND DIETARY SUPPLEMENT PROFILES

WORST PILLS, BEST PILLS NEWSLETTER ARTICLES

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion.

New Research: Safe to Continue Commonly Used Hypertension Drugs in COVID-19 Patients
April 2021
Soon after the coronavirus pandemic began, theoretical concerns were raised about the possibility that the widely prescribed angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) may increase the risk of contracting the coronavirus and predispose COVID-19 patients to more severe illness. Results of a randomized controlled trial provide new evidence that ACE inhibitors and ARBs can be safely continued in patients hospitalized with COVID-19.
Important Drug Interactions for Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
January 2021
Patients taking the widely prescribed angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, such as benazepril (LOTENSIN) and lisinopril (PRINIVIL, QBRELIS, ZESTRIL), should be aware that these medications have clinically important interactions with many other prescription and over-the-counter medications.
Drug-Induced Liver Injury
May 2020
There are more than 1,000 prescription and over-the-counter medications, as well as certain herbal and dietary supplements, that are implicated in liver injury, and the list continues to grow.
Medications that Cause Taste Disorders
April 2019
Drugs are the most frequent cause of taste disturbances. In this article, we identify more than 60 commonly used prescription medications that have been linked to problems with taste.
Potentially Dangerous Lithium Drug Interactions
March 2019
Read about the many prescription medications that can interact in dangerous ways with lithium, the drug of choice for treating bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression.
Preventing Heat-Induced Death and Illness
June 2018
This article lists practical steps to take to avoid death, hospitalization or other medical problems caused by heat stress. It also identifies over 100 drugs that can impair your response to heat and thereby increase your risk of heat-induced illness and death.
Side Effects of Blood Pressure Drugs Often Unmonitored, Unaddressed
June 2017
We discuss new studies confirming that the widely used angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers can potentially harm the kidneys and cause dangerous elevations in blood potassium levels. These studies also indicated that many doctors are not heeding recommenda¬tions to look out for these side effects.
Drugs That Are Most Likely to Land Patients in the Emergency Room
June 2017
Many adverse drug reactions are severe enough to cause serious injury, hospitalization and even death. Find out which outpatient medications are most likely to cause adverse events that necessitate a visit to the emergency room.
Dangers of Post-Surgery Delay in Resuming Blood Pressure Drugs
January 2016
Patients taking drugs to treat high blood pressure often are directed to stop their medication at least 24 hours before surgery. Learn why restarting these medications as soon as possible after surgery could save your life.
Drug Treatments for Chronic Heart Failure
January 2016
For the approximately 5 million Americans suffering from chronic heart failure, there is a wide array of lifesaving drug treatments. Find out our take on the most recent expert guidelines for treating this disease.
Further Evidence Confirms Danger Of Blood Pressure Drugs Used Together
April 2015
Patients should never take more than one of the following drugs used to treat high blood pressure at the same time: an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), and aliskiren. Learn why doing so could have serious, even fatal consequences.
Hypertension Drugs Plus NSAIDs May Injure Kidneys
April 2013
Recent evidence points to increased acute kidney injury associated with combining nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with two antihypertensive drugs: a diuretic plus either an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB). Find out the names of these drugs. This is especially important for patients with hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure or chronic kidney disease, because such patients are routinely treated with diuretics, ACE inhibitors and ARBs.
Do Not Use These Blood Pressure Drugs in Combination
December 2012
It is dangerous to take any of the 18 popular blood pressure drugs of one type (ACE inhibitors) in combination with any of the 14 blood pressure drugs of another type (ARBs). It also is dangerous to take a drug in either of these classes in combination with a newer high blood pressure drug, aliskiren (TEKTURNA). Find out why.
Preventing Heat-Induced Death and Illness
June 2012
This article lists practical steps to take to avoid death, hospitalization or other medical problems caused by heat stress. It also contains a list of 123 drugs that can impair your response to heat.
Some Anti-Hypertensive Drugs Increase the Risk of Gout
May 2012
The article lists many drugs that treat high blood pressure but can also increase the risk of gout. If you have gout, ask your doctor whether your dose of any of these drugs could be reduced or whether you should switch to a medication with a lower gout risk. However, hypertension control is of utmost importance.
Lithium Toxicity Due to Drug Interactions
January 2010
This article lists a large number of drugs, used to treat high blood pressure and other carediovascular disease, that can interact harmfully with lithium (ESKALITH; LITHOBID; LITHONATE;generic lithium carbonate), drugs used to treat bipolar (manic/depressive) disorder. This may result in a dangerous condition known as lithium toxicity because these drugs stop the body from getting rid of lithium and lithium blood levels are increased; in severe cases, this can cause seizures, coma and even death. The article also lists other symptoms of lithium toxicity.
Update on Drugs that Can Cause High Blood Potassium
December 2008
This article lists 68 drugs that can cause high blood potassium (hyperkalemia) that can result in nausea, fatigue, muscle weakness or tingling sensations, as well as heart abnormalities (showing up as an abnormal electrocardiogram). In some cases it can be fatal. If you are taking any of these drugs, be especially careful if you have diabetes or kidney disease. If so, you are at increased risk, and your doctor will have to weigh the risk of giving you these drugs. Also, the older you are, the more likely you are to develop hyperkalemia. Also, make sure you are receiving appropriate laboratory monitoring.
FDA Public Health Advisory: Birth Defects with High Blood Pressure-Lowering Drugs Containing Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors
August 2006
Because of the risk of birth defects, you should contact your physician immediately if you are pregnant and are taking either an ACE or ARB inhibitor at any stage in pregnancy. DO NOT discontinue a blood pressure-lowering drug without first consulting the prescriber.
Drug-Induced Taste Disorders
September 2003
DO NOT stop taking any of the drugs listed in the table without first consulting your physician. You should report any alteration in your sense of taste to your physician if you are taking a drug.
Drug Induced Psychiatric Symptoms
October 2002
This is the first of a two part series on drug induced psychiatric symptoms that is based on the July 8, 2002 issue of The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics. Regular readers of Worst Pills, Best Pills News will recognize The Medical Letter as a reference source written for physicians and pharmacists that we often use because of its reputation as an objective and independent source of drug information. The article lists the drugs and their psychiatric adverse effects.
Older Adults Not Getting the Most Effective Drugs For High Blood Pressure
January 2001
“You, or at least many of your colleagues, have failed to provide optimal care to your patients with high blood pressure.” This stinging critique of physician prescribing practices starts off an editorial in the Journal of General Internal Medicine for October 2000 that commented on a Harvard Medical School study of high blood pressure in older adults that appeared in the same issue.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FROM PUBLIC CITIZEN

Search results below include Additional Information from Public Citizen where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion.

Statement on FDA’s Denial of Public Citizen’s 2012 Petition for a Black Box Warning Recommending Against Combination Therapy with ACE Inhibitors, ARBs, and Aliskiren (HRG Publication #2252)
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) refusal to require a black box warning against the combined use of three widely used classes of blood pressure medications is ill-advised.
Petition to the FDA for Black Box Warnings on ACE Inhibitors, ARBs, and Aliskiren (HRG Publication #2075)
Public Citizen petitions the Food and Drug Administration to place black box warnings on all ACE inhibitors, ARBs, and aliskiren, warning against the use of the medications in combination with one another. The drugs, given individually, are effective in treating high blood pressure, but when used in combination, cause life-threatening side effects with no added benefit.