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Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • New Safety Warnings! Dihydroergotamine (DHE 45 INJECTION, MIGRANAL NASAL SPRAY) for Migraine Headache [hide all summaries]
    (November 2002)
    On July 31, 2002, the strongest type of drug safety warning that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can require, a black box warning, was added to the professional product labeling, or “package insert,” for the migraine headache drug dihydroergotamine (DHE 45 INJECTION, MIGRANAL NASAL SPRAY). The new warning involved numerous drug interactions between dihydroergotamine and other drugs that can raise the blood levels of dihydroergotamine leading to a life-threatening contraction of blood vessels (vasospasm) that can block the flow of blood to the brain and other areas of the body.
  • Public Citizen Health Research Group Publishes Companion to Worst Pills, Best Pills 1999 Edition [hide all summaries]
    (July 2002)
    Since publication of the 1999 edition of our book Worst Pills, Best Pills, a large number of drugs have come on the market. Because of many requests for an update from people who have the 1999 edition, we are publishing the Companion, which must be used in conjunction with the older book because the drugs in the Companion listed as Do Not Use refer to safer alternatives that are discussed in the 1999 edition.
  • New Research Results on Safety of Newly Approved Drugs Causes Health Research Group to Extend Five-Year Waiting Rule to Seven Years [hide all summaries]
    (June 2002)
    A study published in the May 1, 2002 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has resulted in a major change in the Health Research Group’s drug safety policy. The study, in association with physicians from the Harvard Medical School, examined the frequency and timing of the identification of new adverse drug reactions resulting in the addition of a black box warning in the drug’s professional product labeling or its outright removal from the market. You should wait at least seven years from the date of release to take any new drug unless it is one of those rare “therapeutic advances” that offers you a documented therapeutic advantage over older, proven drugs.
  • Do Not Use! The New Birth Control Pill Drospirenone With Ethinyl Estradiol (YASMIN) [hide all summaries]
    (April 2002)
    The combination birth control pill of ethinyl estradiol with drospirenone (YASMIN) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in April 2001. Combination birth control pills contain the hormones estrogen and progestin. There is no medical reason that you should be using Yasmin rather than one of the older pills containing the progestins norgestrel, levonorgestrel or norethindrone.

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