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Search Term: escitalopram (LEXAPRO)


Drug Profiles | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • sibutramine (MERIDIA)
    We list this drug as a Do Not Use drug because it causes very limited weight loss and also causes high blood pressure and increased heart rate.

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • The FDA Should Not Be Promoting Products It Regulates [hide all summaries]
    (November 2014)
    In his editor’s column, Dr. Carome takes the FDA to task for using the agency’s homepage to promote specific medical devices and medications. By becoming the promoter of the products it regulates, the FDA undermines its objectivity and independence.
  • Drug Mix-Ups [hide all summaries]
    (June 2011)
    This article lists 355 drugs with names that are often confused with similar-sounding drug names. Find out what you can do to prevent getting the wrong drug.
  • Watch Out for Interactions with Tamoxifen (NOLVADEX) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2009)
    Tamoxifen (NOLVADEX) is still widely and successfully used for treatment of breast cancer. However, when used along with certain other drugs, its effectiveness can be significantly reduced. The article explains how this can happen and lists 19 different drugs that can cause this serious problem if used with tamoxifen.
  • Dangers of Mixing Alcohol with Certain Medications or Diseases [hide all summaries]
    (August 2008)
    The article discusses 273 drugs that can have harmful interactions with alcohol. Also reviewed are several ways in which these harmful interactions can occur: 1/ Medications Can Increase Alcohol Blood Levels 2/ Additive effects of medications and alcohol. One of the best- known drug-alcohol interactions is when alcohol, a depressant, is taken with other sedative medications, and excessive sedation or depression of respiration can occur 3/Alcohol can increase the blood levels of some medications leading to toxicity of these drugs. 4/ Alcohol also can reduce blood levels of some medications causing them to be less effective. Although some of the interactions between alcohol and medications mainly occur in people who drink heavily (three or more drinks on one occasion), many of these interactions may occur with much lower amounts of alcohol use, such as one to two drinks on an occasion. We strongly urge you to tell your physicians and other health care providers how much alcohol you are drinking so they can effectively assess the risks and advise you about the safe use of alcohol and medications.
  • New Report Sheds Light on Serious Safety Problems with Anti-Smoking Drug Varenicline (CHANTIX) [hide all summaries]
    (July 2008)
    A recent study has found large numbers of reports of psychiatric adverse effects with varenicline (CHANTIX) including hundres of reports of suicidal acts, thoughts or behaviors; possible psychosis; and hostility or aggression.
  • Oxybutynin Patches (OXYTROL): A Grossly Overpriced Product For Overactive Bladder [hide all summaries]
    (July 2003)
    You should check the list of drugs that can cause loss of bladder control before starting drug treatment for this condition. You may be able to change from a drug that causes loss of bladder control to a drug that does not or alter the dose. This may be enough to solve the problem.

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