Search Type: drug or dietary supplement name
Search Term: oxycodone (OXAYDO, OXYCONTIN, ROXICODONE, ROXICODONE INTENSOL, XTAMPZA ER)


Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Disease and Drug Family Information

Search results below include Disease and Drug Family Information where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion
  • Opioids [hide all summaries]
    Most of the time when someone is able to swallow, they should first try a non-opioid drug such as aspirin taken by mouth. If aspirin alone is not effective, it can be combined with an opioid, such as codeine. These two drugs work in different ways, and when they are used together, they generally relieve pain that would otherwise require a higher dose of an opioid, while causing fewer adverse effects.

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion
  • Owner of Drugmaker Linked to Meningitis Outbreak Convicted of Racketeering But Acquitted of Murder [hide all summaries]
    (September 2017)
    In March 2017, a federal jury found the co-owner of a now-bankrupt Massachusetts compounding pharmacy guilty on more than 50 counts of racketeering and mail fraud for his role in the deadly nationwide fungal meningitis outbreak in 2012, which had been linked to tainted steroid drugs. Read the troubling details of how the company’s co-owner escaped being convicted of second-degree murder.
  • Year in Review: Troubling New Drug Approvals in 2016 [hide all summaries]
    (March 2017)
    In this article, we discuss three new drugs approved by the FDA in 2016 that Worst Pills, Best Pills News has identified as ineffective or lacking in evidence to support key claims made on products’ labels. The drugs discussed include one intended to treat a rare form of muscular dystrophy and two supposedly abuse-deterrent opioid pain drugs.
  • News Brief for November 2016 [hide all summaries]
    (November 2016)
    In this month's News Brief section, we report on action taken by the Food and Drug Administration to add important new warnings to the labeling of all opioid and benzodiazepines drugs.
  • News Brief for August 2016 [hide all summaries]
    (August 2016)
    In this month's news briefs, we report on the FDA's decision to require new black-box warnings in the labeling of all immediate-release opioid drugs about the risks of abuse, addiction, overdose and death, as well as the agency's recent drug safety alert reminding consumers not to purchase over-the-counter chelation products. We also discuss the decision of a major drugmaker to terminate its involvement in the marketing of an inhaled form of insulin.
  • Long-Acting Opioids: Extra Caution Needed [hide all summaries]
    (December 2015)
    In this article, we review new evidence suggesting that long-acting opioids are associated with a higher risk of unintentional life-threatening over¬doses than short-acting forms of these drugs.
  • New Study Reveals Many Patients at Risk for Dangerous Alcohol-Drug Interactions [hide all summaries]
    (July 2015)
    Recent research revealed that many patients consume alcohol while using drugs that may can cause dangerous side effects when combined with alcohol. Read this article to learn about the many ways alcohol can adversely interact with prescription and over-the-counter medications.
  • With Some Drugs, Crushing Tablets Or Opening Capsules Could Have Fatal Consequences [hide all summaries]
    (February 2015)
    Patients who have difficulty swallowing pills will sometimes crush tablets or open capsules and sprinkle the resulting powder, fragments or granules into food or liquids. Other patients will resort to chewing their pills before swallowing. Find out the dangers posed by taking such measures.
  • FDA Should Change Labels On Opioid Painkillers to Deter Misprescribing [hide all summaries]
    (September 2012)
    The article reviews a recent petition to the FDA seeking improvements on the labels of prescription opioids (narcotics). The label change would prevent drug companies from promoting these drugs for noncancer pain for dangerously long periods of time, at doses that are too high, and for uses other than severe pain in noncancer patients. The petition was signed by 37 public health experts, including leaders in the fields of pain medicine, addiction and primary care; the health commissioners of New York City and New York state; and Dr. Sidney Wolfe, director of Public Citizen’s Health Research Group.
  • Oxycodone: Be Careful What You Take With It [hide all summaries]
    (September 2009)
    The article lists 24 drugs that can increase the toxicity of oxycodone if taken together with the drug and 11 other drugs that can weaken its effectiveness as a painkiller if they are simutaneously used.
  • Drug Induced Psychiatric Symptoms [hide all summaries]
    (October 2002)
    This is the first of a two part series on drug induced psychiatric symptoms that is based on the July 8, 2002 issue of The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics. Regular readers of Worst Pills, Best Pills News will recognize The Medical Letter as a reference source written for physicians and pharmacists that we often use because of its reputation as an objective and independent source of drug information. The article lists the drugs and their psychiatric adverse effects.

Additional Information from Public Citizen

Search results below include Additional Information from Public Citizen where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion

SHOW secondary search results for oxycodone (OXAYDO, OXYCONTIN, ROXICODONE, ROXICODONE INTENSOL, XTAMPZA ER)

Copyright © 2017 Public Citizen's Health Research Group. All rights reserved. https://www.worstpills.org/