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Search Term: meloxicam (MOBIC)


Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Further Evidence That CELEBREX Is a Do Not Use Drug; New Designation of Diclofenac (VOLTAREN) as a Do Not Use Drug; and Other Do Not Use NSAIDS [hide all summaries]
    (June 2014)
    Learn about new research that provides further evidence affirming our designation of celecoxib (CE¬LEBREX) as a Do Not Use drug and that has prompted us to reclassify diclofenac (VOLTAREN) from Limited Use to Do Not Use. Also find out which NSAIDs are least likely to cause adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks and strokes.
  • Potassium Increases Due to Drug Interactions Can Be Dangerous [hide all summaries]
    (November 2008)
    One of the most common drug interactions occurs when patients take two or more drugs that can each increase blood potassium levels. The resulting condition, hyperkalemia (increased blood potassium levels), can cause nausea, fatigue, muscle weakness or tingling sensations, as well as heart abnormalities, showing up as an abnormal electrocardiogram. In some cases it can be fatal. The article lists 50 drugs which, especially when used in combination, can cause hyperkalemia.
  • Dangers of Mixing Alcohol with Certain Medications or Diseases [hide all summaries]
    (August 2008)
    The article discusses 273 drugs that can have harmful interactions with alcohol. Also reviewed are several ways in which these harmful interactions can occur: 1/ Medications Can Increase Alcohol Blood Levels 2/ Additive effects of medications and alcohol. One of the best- known drug-alcohol interactions is when alcohol, a depressant, is taken with other sedative medications, and excessive sedation or depression of respiration can occur 3/Alcohol can increase the blood levels of some medications leading to toxicity of these drugs. 4/ Alcohol also can reduce blood levels of some medications causing them to be less effective. Although some of the interactions between alcohol and medications mainly occur in people who drink heavily (three or more drinks on one occasion), many of these interactions may occur with much lower amounts of alcohol use, such as one to two drinks on an occasion. We strongly urge you to tell your physicians and other health care providers how much alcohol you are drinking so they can effectively assess the risks and advise you about the safe use of alcohol and medications.
  • Ibuprofen Can Reduce Aspirin’s Protective Effect Against Heart Attacks and Strokes [hide all summaries]
    (March 2008)
    This article explains the dangers of using ibuprofen (MOTRIN, ADVIL) because it interferes with the protective effect of low-dose aspirin to prevent blood clots and protect against heart attacks or strokes. Find out how these two widely-used therapies have a harmful interaction and what you should do.
  • SSRIs Can Have Dangerous Interactions With Other Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2008)
    More than 70 million prescriptions a year are filled for these popular antidepressants, including Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Luvox, Celexa and Lexapro. This article gives details about more than 60 other widely prescribed prescription drugs that can have harmful interactions if used with these antidepressants. The two different kinds of interactions are also discussed.
  • Drug Interactions: Warfarin (COUMADIN) [hide all summaries]
    (December 2007)
    This article explains how to understand the International Normalized Ratio (INR), a test applied to a sample of a patient’s blood to determine how “thin” it is when you are using the blood thinner COUMADIN (warfarin). In addition, the article lists more than 50 drugs or dietary supplements that can interact harmfully with COUMADIN to cause the blood to be too thin (abnormal bleeding) or not thin enough which could result in lessening the effect of COUMADIN in stopping blood clot formation.
  • Celecoxib (CELEBREX) May Double the Risk for Heart Attacks Compared to Older Arthritis Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (May 2006)
    New research published in the March 2006 edition of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine indicates that the popular arthritis and painkilling drug celecoxib (CELEBREX) may double the risk for heart attacks compared to older arthritis medications.
  • FDA Public Health Advisory - Arthritis Drug Valdecoxib (BEXTRA) Removed From Market; Major New Warnings for Other NSAIDs [hide all summaries]
    (June 2005)
    If you are currently taking celecoxib (CELEBREX)you should contact your physician to consider alternative NSAID treatment.

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