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Search Term: ziprasidone (GEODON, ZELDOX)


Drug Profiles | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles | Additional Information from Public Citizen | Health Letter Articles

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Quetiapine (SEROQUEL) Drug Interactions and Heart Trouble [hide all summaries]
    (December 2011)
    Find out about 12 drugs that can interact with widely prescribed quetiapine -- 12 million prescriptions sold in 2010 -- to cause serious, sometimes fatal, heart arrhythmias.
  • Inappropriate Prescribing of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in the Elderly: Inexcusable Deaths and Medicare Dollars Wasted [hide all summaries]
    (August 2011)
    Most prescriptions for antipsychotic drugs to people in nursing homes are inappropriate and quite dangerous. Find out what you can do to protect your family or friends.
  • Dangers of Mixing Alcohol with Certain Medications or Diseases [hide all summaries]
    (August 2008)
    The article discusses 273 drugs that can have harmful interactions with alcohol. Also reviewed are several ways in which these harmful interactions can occur: 1/ Medications Can Increase Alcohol Blood Levels 2/ Additive effects of medications and alcohol. One of the best- known drug-alcohol interactions is when alcohol, a depressant, is taken with other sedative medications, and excessive sedation or depression of respiration can occur 3/Alcohol can increase the blood levels of some medications leading to toxicity of these drugs. 4/ Alcohol also can reduce blood levels of some medications causing them to be less effective. Although some of the interactions between alcohol and medications mainly occur in people who drink heavily (three or more drinks on one occasion), many of these interactions may occur with much lower amounts of alcohol use, such as one to two drinks on an occasion. We strongly urge you to tell your physicians and other health care providers how much alcohol you are drinking so they can effectively assess the risks and advise you about the safe use of alcohol and medications.
  • A Review of Ranolazine (RANEXA) For Chronic Chest Pain [hide all summaries]
    (March 2007)
    Although the FDA medical officer in charge of reviewing ranolazine recommended that ranolazine's professional product labeling display a black box warning about potential disruption in the heart's electrical cycle, the drug does not have a black box warning.
  • Do Not Use Until December 2009 The New Antipsychotic Drug Aripiprazole (ABILIFY) [hide all summaries]
    (June 2003)
    You should follow the Health Research Group’s Seven Year Rule with aripiprazole. There is no evidence to suggest that aripiprazole is a “breakthrough” drug.
  • New Research Results on Safety of Newly Approved Drugs Causes Health Research Group to Extend Five-Year Waiting Rule to Seven Years [hide all summaries]
    (June 2002)
    A study published in the May 1, 2002 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has resulted in a major change in the Health Research Group’s drug safety policy. The study, in association with physicians from the Harvard Medical School, examined the frequency and timing of the identification of new adverse drug reactions resulting in the addition of a black box warning in the drug’s professional product labeling or its outright removal from the market. You should wait at least seven years from the date of release to take any new drug unless it is one of those rare “therapeutic advances” that offers you a documented therapeutic advantage over older, proven drugs.

Additional Information from Public Citizen

Search results below include Additional Information from Public Citizen where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Health Letter Articles

Search results below include Health Letter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Outrage: New Study: Wait Seven Years to Use New Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (June 2002)
    A study published in the May 1, 2002 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has resulted in a major change in the Health Research Group's drug safety policy. The study, in association with physicians from the Harvard Medical School, examined the frequency and timing of the identification of new adverse drug reactions resulting in the addition of a black box warning in the drug's professional product labeling or its outright removal from the market. Three of the authors have close identification with the Health Research Group: its director, Sidney M. Wolfe, and former HRG staffers Drs. Steffi Woolhandler and David Himmelstein. The other co-authors are affiliated with the Harvard Medical School.

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