Search Type: drug or dietary supplement name
Search Term: pantoprazole (PROTONIX)


Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Acid-Suppressing Drugs Associated with Serious Infectious Diarrhea [hide all summaries]
    (July 2017)
    In this article, we discuss how two families of commonly used stomach acid suppressants may make patients more susceptible to Clostridium difficile infection, which can lead to severe, sometimes life-threatening diarrhea.
  • Drug Mix-Ups [hide all summaries]
    (June 2011)
    This article lists 355 drugs with names that are often confused with similar-sounding drug names. Find out what you can do to prevent getting the wrong drug.
  • Dangerous Interaction Between Heartburn Drugs and Clopidogrel (PLAVIX) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2009)
    This article describes how and why people using both PLAVIX, a drug that prevents blood clotting, and heartburn drugs such as NEXIUM had a 27 percent increased risk of heart attacks compared with people using PLAVIX alone.
  • Serious GI Toxicity With The Heart Drug Clopidogrel (PLAVIX) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2005)
    If you are now taking clopidogrel and do not have a severe allergy to aspirin, contact your doctor and discuss switching from clopidogrel to low dose aspirin plus a PPI.
  • Cutting Your Drug Bill While Reducing Your Risk Of Avoidable Adverse Drug Reactions: Six Examples [hide all summaries]
    (February 2005)
    This article will look at the potential savings for the individual consumer if the alternative treatments recommended in Worst Pills, Best Pills were used for six DO NOT USE drugs. All six are listed in the Drug Topics Magazine Top 200 selling drugs in U.S. in 2003. The drugs are: celecoxib (CELEBREX) used for arthritis and pain; the Alzheimer’s disease drug donepezil (ARICEPT); drospirenone with ethinyl estradiol (YASMIN 28), an oral contraceptive; esomeprazole (NEXIUM) the “new purple pill” for heartburn; montelukast (SINGULAIR), a drug approved for both asthma and hay fever; and valdecoxib (BEXTRA), an arthritis drug very similar to celecoxib.The combined sales of these six DO NOT USE drugs was $8.1 billion with more that 75 million prescriptions dispensed in 2003.
  • Over-The-Counter Omeprazole (PRILOSEC OTC) — There Are Better Choices For Heartburn [hide all summaries]
    (October 2003)
    You should try the non-pharmacologic interventions listed in the box below before trying antacids, histamine-2 blockers, or, as a last resort, proton pump inhibitors. If you classify yourself as a person with frequent heartburn, that is heartburn more than two days per week, and the interventions recommended above have failed, you should be under the care of a physician
  • Esomeprazole (NEXIUM)—The Fifth Proton Pump Inhibitor To Suppress Stomach Acid [hide all summaries]
    (November 2001)
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved esomeprazole (NEXIUM) on February 20, 2001 as the fifth member of the “proton pump inhibitor,” or PPI, family of drugs. These drugs work by blocking the final step in the secretion of stomach acid for the treatment of various forms of ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) often manifested as nighttime heartburn. If you are currently taking omeprazole and your symptoms are being adequately controlled, there is no medical reason for you to switch to esomeprazole. Keep an eye out for the release of generic omeprazole, it may save you from 40 to 60 percent at the pharmacy.

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