Search Type: drug or dietary supplement name
Search Term: esomeprazole (NEXIUM, NEXIUM 24HR)


Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Benefits of Probiotics Remain Unproven [hide all summaries]
    (June 2017)
    The food and dietary supplement industries have been swift to capitalize on the excitement surrounding the microbes living on or within our bodies by selling products that contain probiotics, or live microor¬ganisms purported to improve health by altering the microbiome. In this article, we explain which claims about probiotics have been tested in clinical trials — and why many probiotic supplements are very likely a waste of money.
  • Important Information to Know About Clopidogrel [hide all summaries]
    (June 2014)
    Clopidogrel is a widely used drug for reducing the risk of a new heart attack or stroke or cardiovascular death in patients who have had a recent heart attack, stroke or established pe-ripheral vascular disease. This article provides a detailed overview of the drug, including potential serious side effects and important precautions to follow when taking the drug.
  • Inadvertent Adverse Reactions With Commonly Used Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2012)
    Find out how to prevent emergency hospitalizations from two commonly used drugs, warfarin (COUMADIN) and clopidogrel (PLAVIX). There are approximately 33,000 emergency hospitalizations a year from warfarin alone. This article includes a list of more than 50 drugs that can have harmful interactions with warfarin and/or clopidogrel.
  • Drug Mix-Ups [hide all summaries]
    (June 2011)
    This article lists 355 drugs with names that are often confused with similar-sounding drug names. Find out what you can do to prevent getting the wrong drug.
  • Drug Interactions 101 [hide all summaries]
    (November 2007)
    This month marks the beginning of an important addition to every issue of Worst Pills, Best Pills News concerning drug interactions. The articles are being written by one of the world’s top authorities on interactions, Dr. Philip Hansten of the University of Washington. This introductory article explains how to understand different types of interactions and every month, starting now, there will be a specific article on the adverse interaction of the month.
  • Don't Get Sold By Drug Ads on TV, Says Study [hide all summaries]
    (May 2007)
    Not only does this study find that consumer drug ads are not educational, it also says that the ads may oversell the benefits of the drugs and could put the public health in danger. For example, of the 24 drugs included in this advertising study, seven are listed as Do Not Use in Worst Pills, Best Pills publications. You should not rely on direct-to-consumer television advertisements as a source of drug information.
  • Serious GI Toxicity With The Heart Drug Clopidogrel (PLAVIX) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2005)
    If you are now taking clopidogrel and do not have a severe allergy to aspirin, contact your doctor and discuss switching from clopidogrel to low dose aspirin plus a PPI.
  • Over-The-Counter Omeprazole (PRILOSEC OTC) — There Are Better Choices For Heartburn [hide all summaries]
    (October 2003)
    You should try the non-pharmacologic interventions listed in the box below before trying antacids, histamine-2 blockers, or, as a last resort, proton pump inhibitors. If you classify yourself as a person with frequent heartburn, that is heartburn more than two days per week, and the interventions recommended above have failed, you should be under the care of a physician
  • Calcium By Any Other Name is Still Calcium [hide all summaries]
    (May 2003)
    The jackals selling unregulated dietary and herbal supplements have been hard at it bombarding the public with preposterous, unsubstantiated claims about the superiority of their particular miracle natural calcium products. Some disreputable companies have gone beyond just claiming a better calcium product and are now declaring that “coral calcium,” for example if it is from Okinawa, is the secret to good health and a long life.
  • Do Not Use! Dexmethylphenidate (FOCALIN) - a Methylphenidate (RITALIN) Copy [hide all summaries]
    (August 2002)
    Dexmethylphenidate (FOCALIN), approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in November 2001 for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), joins a growing list of Do Not Use drugs, so called because they primarily result in economic harm to both individuals and the health care system. These drugs exist solely to extend a manufacturer’s brand name monopoly position in a lucrative market but offer nothing better than the drugs they replace.

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