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Search Term: esomeprazole (NEXIUM, NEXIUM 24HR)


Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion

Disease and Drug Family Information

Search results below include Disease and Drug Family Information where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion
  • Combination Treatments for Helicobacter Pylori Infection [hide all summaries]
    The bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been implicated in causing ulcer disease. The combination treatments described have high success rates and low recurrence rates, but the treatment is arduous.
  • Ulcers and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) [hide all summaries]
    There are nondrug treatments, with no safety concerns, and less expensive drugs that may be effective for GERD; these should be tried before you use any drugs for heartburn. First, try to avoid foods that trigger your condition (e.g., fatty foods, onions, caffeine, peppermint, and chocolate), and avoid alcohol, smoking, and tight clothing. Second, avoid food, and particularly alcohol, within two or three hours of bedtime. Third, elevate the head of the bed about six inches or sleep with extra pillows.

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Dementia in the Elderly [hide all summaries]
    (August 2016)
    In this article, we review new research linking use of the heartburn and ulcer medications known as proton pump inhibitors to an increased risk of dementia.
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors Might Cause Chronic Kidney Disease [hide all summaries]
    (July 2016)
    Public Citizen's Health Research Group has long warned about the serious risks of the commonly used group of heartburn drugs known as proton pump inhibitors. In this article, we discuss new research suggesting that chronic kidney disease is another potential side effect of these drugs.
  • Antibiotics, Common Heartburn Drugs And Spread of Potentially Fatal Intestinal Infection [hide all summaries]
    (August 2015)
    Proton pump inhibitors, a widely used class of heartburn drugs, and essentially all antibiotics increase your risk of C. difficile infections, which can cause severe, even life-threatening diarrhea illness. Read this article to find out how to protect yourself from this dangerous infection.
  • New Warnings on Common Heartburn Drugs: Too Little — and, for Some, Too Late [hide all summaries]
    (February 2015)
    After a more than three-year delay and a Public Citizen lawsuit filed against the FDA, the agency finally responded to our petition for stronger label warnings on a class of medications, known as proton pump inhibitors, commonly used to treat heartburn. This article discusses the new warnings that the FDA has required in response to our petition.
  • Proton Pump Inhibitors: Dangerous and Habit-Forming Heartburn Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (November 2011)
    PPIs are now one of the most widely used classes of prescription drugs, with an estimated one out of every 20 people in the developed world currently taking one of these medications. However, given that recent research shows PPIs may be habit-forming, that the majority of PPI use is probably inappropriate, with minimal or no benefit to the patient, and that new, life-threatening risks with long-term therapy are continually emerging, it is time for the medical community to re-evaluate the role of PPIs in everyday practice.
  • Interactions Between Methotrexate (TREXALL) and Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) and Many Other Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2011)
    This article discusses the dangerous interactions that can occur when using methotrexate (TREXALL) with certain other drugs. See our list of 27 drugs you should never take with methotrexate.
  • Possible Increased Risk of Fractures With Long-Term, High-Dose Use of Heartburn Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (August 2010)
    The article reviews evidence that patients 50 years old or older who take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs -- a list of the six approved ones is in the article) or use them for a year or more may be at increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist and spine. Since much of the use of these drugs is inappropriate and unnecessarily dangerous, the article discusses pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic alternatives to PPIs.
  • Smoke & Mirror Marketing (& Other Clever Big Pharma Tricks) [hide all summaries]
    (May 2010)
    The article reviews 12 prescription drugs, many of which are top-sellers, all of which are greatly overpriced in comparison to older "versions" of the same drugs. The patents on the old drugs expired so the "innovative" companies patented these new products, gaining a patent on them, and, for all practical purposes, using them as a license to print money. There is no evidence that any of the new ones are better than the now less-expensive, old versions.
  • Dangerous Interaction Between Heartburn Drugs and Clopidogrel (PLAVIX) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2009)
    This article describes how and why people using both PLAVIX, a drug that prevents blood clotting, and heartburn drugs such as NEXIUM had a 27 percent increased risk of heart attacks compared with people using PLAVIX alone.
  • Avoiding Overuse of Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2008)
    This article reviews evidence for the international epidemic of overuse of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), drugs used to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). There were 70 million prescriptions filled in U.S. pharmacies in 2006 for the four leading PPI drugs: esomeprazole (NEXIUM), lansoprazole (PREVACID), pantoprazole (PROTONIX) and rabeprazole (ACIPHIX). Find out about several serious side effects of these drugs such as increased community-acquired pneumonia, increased hip fractures and acute kidney inflammation. Learn about alternatives to using PPIs.
  • Cutting Your Drug Bill While Reducing Your Risk Of Avoidable Adverse Drug Reactions: Six Examples [hide all summaries]
    (February 2005)
    This article will look at the potential savings for the individual consumer if the alternative treatments recommended in Worst Pills, Best Pills were used for six DO NOT USE drugs. All six are listed in the Drug Topics Magazine Top 200 selling drugs in U.S. in 2003. The drugs are: celecoxib (CELEBREX) used for arthritis and pain; the Alzheimer’s disease drug donepezil (ARICEPT); drospirenone with ethinyl estradiol (YASMIN 28), an oral contraceptive; esomeprazole (NEXIUM) the “new purple pill” for heartburn; montelukast (SINGULAIR), a drug approved for both asthma and hay fever; and valdecoxib (BEXTRA), an arthritis drug very similar to celecoxib.The combined sales of these six DO NOT USE drugs was $8.1 billion with more that 75 million prescriptions dispensed in 2003.
  • Selling New Drugs Using Smoke and Mirror (Images) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2003)
    You should avoid these "new" single mirror images of old drugs, not out of concern about their safety or effectiveness, but because they are the same as the old drugs. In the long run, they cause economic harm both to individuals and to the health care system because they have come on the market with extended monopoly protection. Article lists some examples.
  • Esomeprazole (NEXIUM)—The Fifth Proton Pump Inhibitor To Suppress Stomach Acid [hide all summaries]
    (November 2001)
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved esomeprazole (NEXIUM) on February 20, 2001 as the fifth member of the “proton pump inhibitor,” or PPI, family of drugs. These drugs work by blocking the final step in the secretion of stomach acid for the treatment of various forms of ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) often manifested as nighttime heartburn. If you are currently taking omeprazole and your symptoms are being adequately controlled, there is no medical reason for you to switch to esomeprazole. Keep an eye out for the release of generic omeprazole, it may save you from 40 to 60 percent at the pharmacy.

Additional Information from Public Citizen

Search results below include Additional Information from Public Citizen where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion
  • Petition Urging FDA to Add Warnings to Proton Pump Inhibitors (HRG Publication #1964) [hide all summaries]
    Public Citizen petitions the FDA to immediately add black box warnings and other safety information concerning several severe risks to the product labels of all proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) presently on the market in the U.S. In addition, the serious nature of so many of these adverse reactions also mandates the requirement for FDA-approved patient Medication Guides, none of which exist now, for all of these drugs.

Health Letter Articles

Search results below include Health Letter Articles where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion
  • Proton-Pump Inhibitors: Dangerous and Habit-Forming Heartburn Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (September 2011)
    PPIs are now one of the most widely used classes of prescription drugs, with an estimated one out of every 20 people in the developed world currently taking one of these medications. However, given that recent research shows PPIs may be habit-forming, that the majority of PPI use is probably inappropriate, with minimal or no benefit to the patient, and that new, life-threatening risks with long-term therapy are continually emerging, it is time for the medical community to re-evaluate the role of PPIs in everyday practice.

SHOW secondary search results for esomeprazole (NEXIUM, NEXIUM 24HR)

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