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Search Term: rofecoxib (VIOXX)


Drug Profiles | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles | Additional Information from Public Citizen | Health Letter Articles

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Eight Treatments Commonly Used for Osteoarthritis Pain [hide all summaries]
    (July 2015)
    Patients with osteoarthritis have many treatment options. Find out which ones are safest for relieving osteoarthritis pain.
  • Further Evidence That CELEBREX Is a Do Not Use Drug; New Designation of Diclofenac (VOLTAREN) as a Do Not Use Drug; and Other Do Not Use NSAIDS [hide all summaries]
    (June 2014)
    Learn about new research that provides further evidence affirming our designation of celecoxib (CE¬LEBREX) as a Do Not Use drug and that has prompted us to reclassify diclofenac (VOLTAREN) from Limited Use to Do Not Use. Also find out which NSAIDs are least likely to cause adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks and strokes.
  • Applying the Life-Saving 7-Year Rule: An Antiarrhythmic and 3 Anticoagulants [hide all summaries]
    (April 2012)
    Find out why you should not use four recently approved heart drugs — dronedarone (MULTAQ), prasugrel (EFFIENT), dabigatran (PRADAXA) and rivaroxaban (XARELTO) — for at least seven years.
  • Inadvertent Adverse Reactions With Commonly Used Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2012)
    Find out how to prevent emergency hospitalizations from two commonly used drugs, warfarin (COUMADIN) and clopidogrel (PLAVIX). There are approximately 33,000 emergency hospitalizations a year from warfarin alone. This article includes a list of more than 50 drugs that can have harmful interactions with warfarin and/or clopidogrel.
  • Drug Mix-Ups [hide all summaries]
    (June 2011)
    This article lists 355 drugs with names that are often confused with similar-sounding drug names. Find out what you can do to prevent getting the wrong drug.
  • Potassium Increases Due to Drug Interactions Can Be Dangerous [hide all summaries]
    (November 2008)
    One of the most common drug interactions occurs when patients take two or more drugs that can each increase blood potassium levels. The resulting condition, hyperkalemia (increased blood potassium levels), can cause nausea, fatigue, muscle weakness or tingling sensations, as well as heart abnormalities, showing up as an abnormal electrocardiogram. In some cases it can be fatal. The article lists 50 drugs which, especially when used in combination, can cause hyperkalemia.
  • Dangers of Mixing Alcohol with Certain Medications or Diseases [hide all summaries]
    (August 2008)
    The article discusses 273 drugs that can have harmful interactions with alcohol. Also reviewed are several ways in which these harmful interactions can occur: 1/ Medications Can Increase Alcohol Blood Levels 2/ Additive effects of medications and alcohol. One of the best- known drug-alcohol interactions is when alcohol, a depressant, is taken with other sedative medications, and excessive sedation or depression of respiration can occur 3/Alcohol can increase the blood levels of some medications leading to toxicity of these drugs. 4/ Alcohol also can reduce blood levels of some medications causing them to be less effective. Although some of the interactions between alcohol and medications mainly occur in people who drink heavily (three or more drinks on one occasion), many of these interactions may occur with much lower amounts of alcohol use, such as one to two drinks on an occasion. We strongly urge you to tell your physicians and other health care providers how much alcohol you are drinking so they can effectively assess the risks and advise you about the safe use of alcohol and medications.
  • FDA Requests New Safety Warnings for AMBIEN (Zolpidem), Other Sleeping Pills [hide all summaries]
    (May 2007)
    Patients taking sleep medications could be at risk of severe allergic reactions and complex sleep-related behaviors, which may include sleep driving, driving while not fully awake after ingestion of a sleeping pill, with no memory of the event, according to the FDA. DO NOT suddenly stop taking sleeping pills without consulting your physician because of the possibility of withdrawal reactions.
  • Celecoxib (CELEBREX) May Double the Risk for Heart Attacks Compared to Older Arthritis Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (May 2006)
    New research published in the March 2006 edition of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine indicates that the popular arthritis and painkilling drug celecoxib (CELEBREX) may double the risk for heart attacks compared to older arthritis medications.
  • FDA Public Health Advisory - Arthritis Drug Valdecoxib (BEXTRA) Removed From Market; Major New Warnings for Other NSAIDs [hide all summaries]
    (June 2005)
    If you are currently taking celecoxib (CELEBREX)you should contact your physician to consider alternative NSAID treatment.
  • Cutting Your Drug Bill While Reducing Your Risk Of Avoidable Adverse Drug Reactions: Six Examples [hide all summaries]
    (February 2005)
    This article will look at the potential savings for the individual consumer if the alternative treatments recommended in Worst Pills, Best Pills were used for six DO NOT USE drugs. All six are listed in the Drug Topics Magazine Top 200 selling drugs in U.S. in 2003. The drugs are: celecoxib (CELEBREX) used for arthritis and pain; the Alzheimer’s disease drug donepezil (ARICEPT); drospirenone with ethinyl estradiol (YASMIN 28), an oral contraceptive; esomeprazole (NEXIUM) the “new purple pill” for heartburn; montelukast (SINGULAIR), a drug approved for both asthma and hay fever; and valdecoxib (BEXTRA), an arthritis drug very similar to celecoxib.The combined sales of these six DO NOT USE drugs was $8.1 billion with more that 75 million prescriptions dispensed in 2003.
  • Lawsuit Reveals Serious Safety Problems with the Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Valdecoxib (BEXTRA) [hide all summaries]
    (September 2004)
    Public Citizen filed suit in the District Court for the District of Columbia on February 25, 2004 against the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) asking that they make public complete copies of the agency’s scientific reviews of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) valdecoxib (BEXTRA).
  • Prescription Drug Ads and High Drug Prices: A Relationship? [hide all summaries]
    (April 2004)
    According to a supplement put out by Advertising Age in March entitled Fact Pack 2004 Edition, with additional information taken from Ad Age’s web site, the pharmaceutical industry continues to be quite adept at maintaining its place among the leading advertisers. Four of the top 25 U.S. advertisers, in terms of spending in this country during 2002, were drug companies. The article urges that you do not waste your time looking at or listening to prescription (or over-the-counter) drug ads.
  • Comparative Gastrointestinal (GI) Toxicity of Six Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) [hide all summaries]
    (August 2002)
    The British equivalent of our Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in the April 2002 issue of its newsletter Current Problems in Pharmacovigilance, published a ranking of the relative gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of some of the widely used older nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These drugs are commonly used for acute pain and the treatment of the symptoms of osteo- and rheumatoid arthritis.

Additional Information from Public Citizen

Search results below include Additional Information from Public Citizen where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Health Letter Articles

Search results below include Health Letter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • What Happened in U.S. Health Care in 2007? [hide all summaries]
    (December 2007)
    This article summarizes 14 important health events that occurred in 2007, including seven that involve the pharmaceutical industry or its increasingly close financial partner, the FDA. Seven other reviews involve our so-called health care system.

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