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Search Term: warfarin (COUMADIN, JANTOVEN)


Drug Profiles | Disease and Drug Family Information | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles | Additional Information from Public Citizen

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Disease and Drug Family Information

Search results below include Disease and Drug Family Information where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Salicylates and Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) [hide all summaries]
    The salicylates are used to relieve pain and to reduce fever and inflammation. Aspirin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is the most well-known and frequently used salicylate. Other salicylates discussed on this web site are salsalate and choline and magnesium salicylates.
  • Vitamins and Minerals [hide all summaries]
    One promotional strategy of supplement suppliers is to make people worry about whether they are getting enough nutrients. But do most people really need to take vitamins and minerals to supplement their diets? Or are they a waste of money? Are there better alternatives to taking supplements to ensure adequate nutrition? This section will attempt to answer these questions and help you sort through the fact and fiction surrounding nutritional supplements.

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Do Not Use the New Blood Thinner Edoxaban (SAVAYSA) [hide all summaries]
    (November 2017)
    Learn why edoxaban, one of the new blood thinners approved by the FDA, is not the best option for preventing dangerous blood clots in patients with atrial fibrillation.
  • Study Uncovers Serious Underreporting of Harms in Orlistat’s Trials [hide all summaries]
    (June 2017)
    For many years, we have designated the weight-loss drug orlistat (XENICAL, ALLI) as Do Not Use because it exposes patients to serious risks that greatly outweigh its minimal benefits. In this article, we describe data from a new study showing that orlistat’s side effects were seriously underreported in published medical journal articles for the clinical trials that the drugmaker conducted to support the drug’s approval.
  • Spironolactone: Review of a ‘Water Pill’ [hide all summaries]
    (March 2017)
    Spironolactone is a diuretic (water pill) that has been used for decades to treat certain patients with high blood pressure, heart failure, swelling (water retention) and other conditions. Find out who is most likely to benefit from using this drug and who should avoid it because of its dangerous adverse effects.
  • What Is a Drug Label? [hide all summaries]
    (June 2016)
    Drug labels provide important information regarding the benefits and risks of prescription medications. In this article, we offer guidance on where to find these drug labels and identify the sections of the label that provide the most useful information for patients.
  • Is XARELTO Really the 'Right Move' for Patients With Blood Clots or Risk for Stroke? [hide all summaries]
    (April 2016)
    If you watch TV, you likely have seen ads touting the advantages of the new oral antico-agulant (blood thinner) rivaroxaban (XARELTO). Learn why we have designated this drug as Do Not Use for Seven Years (until at least July 2018).
  • St. John’s Wort: No ‘Wonder Remedy’ for Depression [hide all summaries]
    (February 2016)
    St. John’s wort, an over-the-counter herbal supplement, has been around for centuries, and many patients have been using it in recent years to self-medicate for depression. In this article, we explain why St. John’s wort should not be used to treat this disease.
  • More on the New Stroke Prevention Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (May 2013)
    An update on last month's article about three relatively new, widely used stroke prevention drugs: dabigatran (PRADAXA), rivaroxaban (XARELTO) and apixaban (ELIQUIS).
  • Emerging Risks With New Stroke Prevention Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (April 2013)
    Learn about three new drugs to prevent stroke – so new that their risks relative to those of a much older drug, warfarin (Coumadin), are unknown.
  • Risk of Bleeding and Use of Antidepressants After Heart Attack [hide all summaries]
    (March 2012)
    The article discusses why taking certain antidepressants after a heart attack may increase the risk of bleeding. Find out which ones are the culprits.
  • Drug Mix-Ups [hide all summaries]
    (June 2011)
    This article lists 355 drugs with names that are often confused with similar-sounding drug names. Find out what you can do to prevent getting the wrong drug.
  • 29 Medications That May Cause Adverse Interactions with Thyroid Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (September 2008)
    Thyroid medications are among the most widely-prescribed drugs in the U.S. In this article, we review 29 different medications that can have harmful interactions with thyroid medicines such as levothyroxine (Synthroid). There are four major kinds of interaction problems that can occur: • Certain medications can decrease the absorption of levothyroxine resulting in lower levels in the blood. • Other medications can increase the rate at which the body gets rid of levothyroxine, also resulting in lower thyroid levels in the blood. • Other medications can cause changes of levothyroxine binding in blood, decreasing the body's ability to use levothyroxine. • Levothyroxine can affect the safety or effectiveness of other medications by raising or lowering the levels of these other drugs in the blood, causing them to be either infective (lower levels) or dangerous (higher levels).
  • Dangers of Mixing Alcohol with Certain Medications or Diseases [hide all summaries]
    (August 2008)
    The article discusses 273 drugs that can have harmful interactions with alcohol. Also reviewed are several ways in which these harmful interactions can occur: 1/ Medications Can Increase Alcohol Blood Levels 2/ Additive effects of medications and alcohol. One of the best- known drug-alcohol interactions is when alcohol, a depressant, is taken with other sedative medications, and excessive sedation or depression of respiration can occur 3/Alcohol can increase the blood levels of some medications leading to toxicity of these drugs. 4/ Alcohol also can reduce blood levels of some medications causing them to be less effective. Although some of the interactions between alcohol and medications mainly occur in people who drink heavily (three or more drinks on one occasion), many of these interactions may occur with much lower amounts of alcohol use, such as one to two drinks on an occasion. We strongly urge you to tell your physicians and other health care providers how much alcohol you are drinking so they can effectively assess the risks and advise you about the safe use of alcohol and medications.
  • Macrolide Antibiotic Drug Interactions [hide all summaries]
    (February 2008)
    The article discusses the adverse drug interactions between either of two widely-prescribed macrolide antibiotics, erythromycin (as in ERYTHROCIN) and clarithromycin (BIAXIN)and more than 40 other drugs that are listed in a table in the article. It also describes the nature of the adverse interactions that can occur.
  • SSRIs Can Have Dangerous Interactions With Other Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2008)
    More than 70 million prescriptions a year are filled for these popular antidepressants, including Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Luvox, Celexa and Lexapro. This article gives details about more than 60 other widely prescribed prescription drugs that can have harmful interactions if used with these antidepressants. The two different kinds of interactions are also discussed.
  • Adverse Drug Reactions Cause 1.4 Million Emergency Room Visits in 2004 and 2005 [hide all summaries]
    (January 2007)
    An estimated 701,547 patients were treated for adverse drug reactions in emergency rooms each year in 2004 and 2005, totaling 1.4 million visits to the emergency room. Of these, an estimated 117,318 patients were hospitalized each year. According to the study. 18 drugs were each, either independently or in combination with other drugs, implicated in one percent or more of the estimated adverse drug events. These drugs are listed in the table that accompanies this article along with the annual estimates of adverse drug events.
  • Do Not Use! Rosuvastatin (Crestor) - A New But More Dangerous Cholesterol Lowering 'Statin' Drug [hide all summaries]
    (October 2003)
    Rosuvastatin (CRESTOR) became the sixth cholesterol lowering "statin" drug on the U.S. There is no medical reason for you to be taking rosuvastatin when there are three safer and more effective statins, in terms of reducing cardiovascular events, on the market.
  • Do Not Use! New Safety Warning Added to the Arthritis Drug Valdecoxib (BEXTRA) [hide all summaries]
    (January 2003)
    There is an additional similarity (aside from our listing both as DO NOT USE drugs) between valdecoxib and celecoxib, both are sulfa drugs and individuals who are allergic to sulfa drugs should not use them. Although celecoxib came on the market with a warning about sulfa drug allergy, valdecoxib did not. We previously wrote “It may be a dangerous oversight on the part of the FDA not to have required the same warning for valdecoxib.” Unfortunately, because uninformed patients have been needlessly harmed, our prediction has come to pass.
  • Do Not Use! Dexmethylphenidate (FOCALIN) - a Methylphenidate (RITALIN) Copy [hide all summaries]
    (August 2002)
    Dexmethylphenidate (FOCALIN), approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in November 2001 for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), joins a growing list of Do Not Use drugs, so called because they primarily result in economic harm to both individuals and the health care system. These drugs exist solely to extend a manufacturer’s brand name monopoly position in a lucrative market but offer nothing better than the drugs they replace.

Additional Information from Public Citizen

Search results below include Additional Information from Public Citizen where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

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