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Search Term: pseudoephedrine (SUDAFED)


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Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion
  • pseudoephedrine (SUDAFED)
    We list this drug as a Do Not Use drug because it raises heart rate and blood pressure and causes heart attacks and strokes.

Disease and Drug Family Information

Search results below include Disease and Drug Family Information where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion
  • Allergy and Hayfever [hide all summaries]
    If you suffer from an itchy and runny nose, watery eyes, sneezing, and a tickle in the back of your throat, then you probably have an allergy. An allergy means a hypersensitivity to a particular substance called an allergen. Hypersensitivity means that the body’s immune system, which defends against infection, disease, and foreign bodies, reacts inappropriately to the allergen. Examples of common allergens are pollen, mold, ragweed, dust, feathers, cat hair, makeup, walnuts, aspirin, shellfish, poison ivy, and chocolate.
  • Cough and Cold [hide all summaries]
    Many prescription or over-the-counter drug combinations of two or more ingredients should not be used because they are irrational combinations of single ingredients, some of which are safe and effective and sensible to use alone if treating the symptom for which they are intended. The combinations, however, present extra risks for extra ingredients that will usually not add any benefit (possibly a risk) to the first ingredient and will invariably cost much more than the single ingredient alone.

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion
  • Treatment for Nasal Allergies: An Updated Review [hide all summaries]
    (April 2016)
    With spring time pollen counts soaring, many patients with seasonal nasal allergies will be looking for relief from allergy medications. Learn the best available treatments to stay safe and relatively symptom-free during allergy season and throughout the year.
  • Adverse Reactions to Cough and Cold Meds Sent 1500 Babies to the Emergency Room in 2004, 2005 [hide all summaries]
    (March 2007)
    Prescription and over-the-counter cough and cold medications should not be used in children younger than 2 years of age. For example, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy statement advising that parents should be told that efficacy of the cough suppressants codeine and dextromethorphan in young children was unproven, and that there is a potential for adverse drug reactions.
  • Drug Induced Psychiatric Symptoms (Part 2) [hide all summaries]
    (November 2002)
    This is the second of a two-part series on drug-induced psychiatric symptoms that began in last month’s Worst Pills, Best Pills News. The information is based on the July 8, 2002 issue of The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics. Article lists drugs and adverse effects.

Additional Information from Public Citizen

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