Search Type: drug or dietary supplement name
Search Term: aspirin (DURLAZA, EASPRIN, ECOTRIN, EMPIRIN, GENUINE BAYER ASPIRIN)


Drug Profiles | Disease and Drug Family Information | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles | Additional Information from Public Citizen

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Disease and Drug Family Information

Search results below include Disease and Drug Family Information where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Antipsychotic Drugs: Dangerously Overused [hide all summaries]
    Antipsychotic drugs, also called neuroleptic drugs or major tranquilizers, are properly and successfully used to treat serious psychotic mental disorders, the most common of which is schizophrenia. In younger adults, an alarming number of those with schizophrenia who could and often have previously benefited from antipsychotic drugs are not receiving them. They are seen, among other places, on the streets and in homeless shelters. In older adults, the problem is not underuse but, rather, gross overuse by people who are not psychotic.
  • Cough and Cold [hide all summaries]
    Many prescription or over-the-counter drug combinations of two or more ingredients should not be used because they are irrational combinations of single ingredients, some of which are safe and effective and sensible to use alone if treating the symptom for which they are intended. The combinations, however, present extra risks for extra ingredients that will usually not add any benefit (possibly a risk) to the first ingredient and will invariably cost much more than the single ingredient alone.
  • Migraine Headaches [hide all summaries]
    For reasons of both safety and cost, the newer migraine drugs known as triptans should be used only after determining that the NSAIDs and acetaminophen fail to work. The triptans can dangerously, even fatally, narrow arteries in the heart.
  • Muscle Relaxants [hide all summaries]
    Some of the widely prescribed muscle relaxants covered on this web site have been on the market for more than 40 years. Yet five of these drugs were among the top 200 most frequently prescribed medications in the United States in 2002, with more than 30 million prescriptions dispensed. Since their original marketing, there has been very little reliable evidence that these drugs actually relax muscles.
  • Ulcers and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) [hide all summaries]
    There are nondrug treatments, with no safety concerns, and less expensive drugs that may be effective for GERD; these should be tried before you use any drugs for heartburn. First, try to avoid foods that trigger your condition (e.g., fatty foods, onions, caffeine, peppermint, and chocolate), and avoid alcohol, smoking, and tight clothing. Second, avoid food, and particularly alcohol, within two or three hours of bedtime. Third, elevate the head of the bed about six inches or sleep with extra pillows.

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Do Not Use the New Blood Thinner Edoxaban (SAVAYSA) [hide all summaries]
    (November 2017)
    Learn why edoxaban, one of the new blood thinners approved by the FDA, is not the best option for preventing dangerous blood clots in patients with atrial fibrillation.
  • Corticosteroid Injections Not Beneficial for Knee Osteoarthritis [hide all summaries]
    (November 2017)
    The injection of corticosteroids into the knee joints of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee is a widespread practice. Find out the results of new research funded by the National Institutes of Health showing that such injections actually may accelerate joint damage.
  • Important Information to Know About Clopidogrel [hide all summaries]
    (June 2014)
    Clopidogrel is a widely used drug for reducing the risk of a new heart attack or stroke or cardiovascular death in patients who have had a recent heart attack, stroke or established pe-ripheral vascular disease. This article provides a detailed overview of the drug, including potential serious side effects and important precautions to follow when taking the drug.
  • Zinc as a Cold Remedy: Still Waiting for Good Evidence [hide all summaries]
    (November 2013)
    A familiar and heavily promoted remedy for colds, zinc has not been found to have very important benefits. This article analyzes studies purporting to show such benefits.
  • Dr. Sidney Wolfe Turns Health Research Group Leadership Over to Dr. Michael Carome [hide all summaries]
    (July 2013)
    Dr. Carome will be directing Public Citizen’s Health Research Group, but Dr. Wolfe will still be working on the issues he has previously focused on, such as drug safety.
  • Vitamin D Ineffective in Treating Osteoarthritis Of the Knee [hide all summaries]
    (June 2013)
    A recent study contradicted earlier beliefs by finding that vitamin D supplements (CALCIFEROL) given to people with osteoarthritis of the knee were ineffective in relieving knee pain or slowing damage to the knee joint.
  • Troubling New Drug Approvals in 2012 [hide all summaries]
    (March 2013)
    Find out which drugs approved in 2012 have risks greatly exceeding their benefits or no meaningful benefits. If you are using any of the DO NOT USE drugs reviewed in the article, talk to your doctor before stopping their use.
  • Inappropriate Prescribing of Medicines in the Elderly: A Persistent Problem [hide all summaries]
    (March 2013)
    Approximately 20 percent of prescriptions for elderly patients in primary care settings are inappropriate, leading to adverse reactions that are entirely preventable. The article lists some of the most common inappropriately prescribed drugs.
  • Steroid Injections and Other Treatments for Lower Back Pain [hide all summaries]
    (November 2012)
    The recent epidemic of life-threatening and fatal infections from contaminated spinal steroid injections is a reminder of the larger issue of their use, even if not contaminated. The article discusses risks that remain even with properly manufactured medications, describing how patients and physicians should know when not to use steroids, consider the risks and benefits of the procedure, and understand other treatment options before using steroids to treat lower back pain.
  • Inadvertent Adverse Reactions With Commonly Used Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2012)
    Find out how to prevent emergency hospitalizations from two commonly used drugs, warfarin (COUMADIN) and clopidogrel (PLAVIX). There are approximately 33,000 emergency hospitalizations a year from warfarin alone. This article includes a list of more than 50 drugs that can have harmful interactions with warfarin and/or clopidogrel.
  • Another Chapter in the Long History of Exposing the Dangers of the Most Popular Drug in America [hide all summaries]
    (July 2009)
    This article documents how long it has taken the FDA to fully implement a recommendation from its own advisory committee 32 years ago stating that: "Do not exceed the recommended dosage [acetaminophen--as in Tylenol] because severe liver damage may occur." Other countries have done more.
  • Avoiding Overuse of Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2008)
    This article reviews evidence for the international epidemic of overuse of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), drugs used to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). There were 70 million prescriptions filled in U.S. pharmacies in 2006 for the four leading PPI drugs: esomeprazole (NEXIUM), lansoprazole (PREVACID), pantoprazole (PROTONIX) and rabeprazole (ACIPHIX). Find out about several serious side effects of these drugs such as increased community-acquired pneumonia, increased hip fractures and acute kidney inflammation. Learn about alternatives to using PPIs.
  • Drug Interactions: Warfarin (COUMADIN) [hide all summaries]
    (December 2007)
    This article explains how to understand the International Normalized Ratio (INR), a test applied to a sample of a patient’s blood to determine how “thin” it is when you are using the blood thinner COUMADIN (warfarin). In addition, the article lists more than 50 drugs or dietary supplements that can interact harmfully with COUMADIN to cause the blood to be too thin (abnormal bleeding) or not thin enough which could result in lessening the effect of COUMADIN in stopping blood clot formation.
  • Adverse Drug Reactions Cause 1.4 Million Emergency Room Visits in 2004 and 2005 [hide all summaries]
    (January 2007)
    An estimated 701,547 patients were treated for adverse drug reactions in emergency rooms each year in 2004 and 2005, totaling 1.4 million visits to the emergency room. Of these, an estimated 117,318 patients were hospitalized each year. According to the study. 18 drugs were each, either independently or in combination with other drugs, implicated in one percent or more of the estimated adverse drug events. These drugs are listed in the table that accompanies this article along with the annual estimates of adverse drug events.
  • Glucosamine and Chondroitin for Knee Arthritis - Still No Evidence of Effectiveness [hide all summaries]
    (May 2006)
    In the most rigorous study to date, there was no evidence of effectiveness for glucosamine, chondroitin or the two together. We continue to recommend against the use of these unregulated supplements.
  • FDA Public Health Advisory - Arthritis Drug Valdecoxib (BEXTRA) Removed From Market; Major New Warnings for Other NSAIDs [hide all summaries]
    (June 2005)
    If you are currently taking celecoxib (CELEBREX)you should contact your physician to consider alternative NSAID treatment.
  • Serious GI Toxicity With The Heart Drug Clopidogrel (PLAVIX) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2005)
    If you are now taking clopidogrel and do not have a severe allergy to aspirin, contact your doctor and discuss switching from clopidogrel to low dose aspirin plus a PPI.
  • Cutting Your Drug Bill While Reducing Your Risk Of Avoidable Adverse Drug Reactions: Six Examples [hide all summaries]
    (February 2005)
    This article will look at the potential savings for the individual consumer if the alternative treatments recommended in Worst Pills, Best Pills were used for six DO NOT USE drugs. All six are listed in the Drug Topics Magazine Top 200 selling drugs in U.S. in 2003. The drugs are: celecoxib (CELEBREX) used for arthritis and pain; the Alzheimer’s disease drug donepezil (ARICEPT); drospirenone with ethinyl estradiol (YASMIN 28), an oral contraceptive; esomeprazole (NEXIUM) the “new purple pill” for heartburn; montelukast (SINGULAIR), a drug approved for both asthma and hay fever; and valdecoxib (BEXTRA), an arthritis drug very similar to celecoxib.The combined sales of these six DO NOT USE drugs was $8.1 billion with more that 75 million prescriptions dispensed in 2003.
  • Blockbuster Arthritis Drug Rofecoxib (VIOXX) Withdrawn From Market [hide all summaries]
    (November 2004)
    Vioxx is the ninth prescription drug to be taken off the market in the past seven years that Worst Pills, Best Pills News readers were previously warned DO NOT USE. The average time between warning readers not to use these drugs and their removal from the market was one year and eight months.

Additional Information from Public Citizen

Search results below include Additional Information from Public Citizen where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

SHOW primary search results for aspirin (DURLAZA, EASPRIN, ECOTRIN, EMPIRIN, GENUINE BAYER ASPIRIN)

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