Search Type: drug or dietary supplement name
Search Term: acetaminophen (TYLENOL)


Drug Profiles | Disease and Drug Family Information | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Disease and Drug Family Information

Search results below include Disease and Drug Family Information where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Cough and Cold [hide all summaries]
    Many prescription or over-the-counter drug combinations of two or more ingredients should not be used because they are irrational combinations of single ingredients, some of which are safe and effective and sensible to use alone if treating the symptom for which they are intended. The combinations, however, present extra risks for extra ingredients that will usually not add any benefit (possibly a risk) to the first ingredient and will invariably cost much more than the single ingredient alone.
  • Migraine Headaches [hide all summaries]
    For reasons of both safety and cost, the newer migraine drugs known as triptans should be used only after determining that the NSAIDs and acetaminophen fail to work. The triptans can dangerously, even fatally, narrow arteries in the heart.
  • Ulcers and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) [hide all summaries]
    There are nondrug treatments, with no safety concerns, and less expensive drugs that may be effective for GERD; these should be tried before you use any drugs for heartburn. First, try to avoid foods that trigger your condition (e.g., fatty foods, onions, caffeine, peppermint, and chocolate), and avoid alcohol, smoking, and tight clothing. Second, avoid food, and particularly alcohol, within two or three hours of bedtime. Third, elevate the head of the bed about six inches or sleep with extra pillows.

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Corticosteroid Injections Not Beneficial for Knee Osteoarthritis [hide all summaries]
    (November 2017)
    The injection of corticosteroids into the knee joints of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee is a widespread practice. Find out the results of new research funded by the National Institutes of Health showing that such injections actually may accelerate joint damage.
  • “Natural” Teething Remedies Also May Be Deadly [hide all summaries]
    (July 2017)
    Parents may be tempted to try assorted teething remedies for their infants. Learn about certain homeopathic products for teething that have been recalled because they were linked to a large number of serious injuries in infants.
  • Responsible Disposal of Prescription Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (May 2016)
    For various reasons, many prescribed medications go unused. Such leftover medications can pose a hazard to family members, especially young children, and the environment. Find out the best ways to safely dispose of unused prescription medications.
  • The Best Drug for Severe Acute Low Back Pain [hide all summaries]
    (April 2016)
    Low back pain is the fifth most common reason for outpatient doc¬tor visits and leads to 2.6 million emergency room visits in the U.S. every year. This article reviews results of the newest research on which pain relievers are safest and most effective for managing severe low back pain.
  • Adding NSAIDS or Aspirin to Anticoagulants Increases Bleeding Danger [hide all summaries]
    (December 2014)
    If you are one of the millions of patients in the U.S. who take blood thinners on a long-term basis to prevent potentially harmful clots in the heart, veins or arteries, read this article to learn why you should avoid taking NSAIDS or aspirin unless absolutely necessary.
  • Zinc as a Cold Remedy: Still Waiting for Good Evidence [hide all summaries]
    (November 2013)
    A familiar and heavily promoted remedy for colds, zinc has not been found to have very important benefits. This article analyzes studies purporting to show such benefits.
  • Vitamin D Ineffective in Treating Osteoarthritis Of the Knee [hide all summaries]
    (June 2013)
    A recent study contradicted earlier beliefs by finding that vitamin D supplements (CALCIFEROL) given to people with osteoarthritis of the knee were ineffective in relieving knee pain or slowing damage to the knee joint.
  • Hypertension Drugs Plus NSAIDs May Injure Kidneys [hide all summaries]
    (April 2013)
    Recent evidence points to increased acute kidney injury associated with combining nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with two antihypertensive drugs: a diuretic plus either an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB). Find out the names of these drugs. This is especially important for patients with hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure or chronic kidney disease, because such patients are routinely treated with diuretics, ACE inhibitors and ARBs.
  • The FDA Must Restrict the Use of Prescription Narcotic Hydrocodone [hide all summaries]
    (March 2013)
    Find out why the most commonly prescribed drug of any kind in the U.S., hydrocodone, needs tighter restrictions to prevent emergency room visits, overdose deaths and other serious consequences of its massive overuse. Production and use of hydrocodone in this country amounts to 99 percent of that for the entire world. Is the rest of the world wrong and we are right?
  • Inappropriate Prescribing of Medicines in the Elderly: A Persistent Problem [hide all summaries]
    (March 2013)
    Approximately 20 percent of prescriptions for elderly patients in primary care settings are inappropriate, leading to adverse reactions that are entirely preventable. The article lists some of the most common inappropriately prescribed drugs.
  • Inadvertent Adverse Reactions With Commonly Used Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2012)
    Find out how to prevent emergency hospitalizations from two commonly used drugs, warfarin (COUMADIN) and clopidogrel (PLAVIX). There are approximately 33,000 emergency hospitalizations a year from warfarin alone. This article includes a list of more than 50 drugs that can have harmful interactions with warfarin and/or clopidogrel.
  • Drug Mix-Ups [hide all summaries]
    (June 2011)
    This article lists 355 drugs with names that are often confused with similar-sounding drug names. Find out what you can do to prevent getting the wrong drug.
  • Dangers of Mixing Alcohol with Certain Medications or Diseases [hide all summaries]
    (August 2008)
    The article discusses 273 drugs that can have harmful interactions with alcohol. Also reviewed are several ways in which these harmful interactions can occur: 1/ Medications Can Increase Alcohol Blood Levels 2/ Additive effects of medications and alcohol. One of the best- known drug-alcohol interactions is when alcohol, a depressant, is taken with other sedative medications, and excessive sedation or depression of respiration can occur 3/Alcohol can increase the blood levels of some medications leading to toxicity of these drugs. 4/ Alcohol also can reduce blood levels of some medications causing them to be less effective. Although some of the interactions between alcohol and medications mainly occur in people who drink heavily (three or more drinks on one occasion), many of these interactions may occur with much lower amounts of alcohol use, such as one to two drinks on an occasion. We strongly urge you to tell your physicians and other health care providers how much alcohol you are drinking so they can effectively assess the risks and advise you about the safe use of alcohol and medications.
  • Avoiding Overuse of Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2008)
    This article reviews evidence for the international epidemic of overuse of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), drugs used to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). There were 70 million prescriptions filled in U.S. pharmacies in 2006 for the four leading PPI drugs: esomeprazole (NEXIUM), lansoprazole (PREVACID), pantoprazole (PROTONIX) and rabeprazole (ACIPHIX). Find out about several serious side effects of these drugs such as increased community-acquired pneumonia, increased hip fractures and acute kidney inflammation. Learn about alternatives to using PPIs.
  • Ibuprofen Can Reduce Aspirin’s Protective Effect Against Heart Attacks and Strokes [hide all summaries]
    (March 2008)
    This article explains the dangers of using ibuprofen (MOTRIN, ADVIL) because it interferes with the protective effect of low-dose aspirin to prevent blood clots and protect against heart attacks or strokes. Find out how these two widely-used therapies have a harmful interaction and what you should do.
  • Drug Interactions: Warfarin (COUMADIN) [hide all summaries]
    (December 2007)
    This article explains how to understand the International Normalized Ratio (INR), a test applied to a sample of a patient’s blood to determine how “thin” it is when you are using the blood thinner COUMADIN (warfarin). In addition, the article lists more than 50 drugs or dietary supplements that can interact harmfully with COUMADIN to cause the blood to be too thin (abnormal bleeding) or not thin enough which could result in lessening the effect of COUMADIN in stopping blood clot formation.
  • Adverse Drug Reactions Cause 1.4 Million Emergency Room Visits in 2004 and 2005 [hide all summaries]
    (January 2007)
    An estimated 701,547 patients were treated for adverse drug reactions in emergency rooms each year in 2004 and 2005, totaling 1.4 million visits to the emergency room. Of these, an estimated 117,318 patients were hospitalized each year. According to the study. 18 drugs were each, either independently or in combination with other drugs, implicated in one percent or more of the estimated adverse drug events. These drugs are listed in the table that accompanies this article along with the annual estimates of adverse drug events.
  • Reporting Adverse Events From Drugs and Medical Devices To The Food and Drug Administration [hide all summaries]
    (December 2006)
    Consumers can play a vital role in protecting the public health by reporting to the Food and Drug Administration the often serious health problems they experience while taking prescription drugs and dietary and herbal supplements or while using medical devices. The article details different ways to report to the FDA.
  • Celecoxib (CELEBREX) May Double the Risk for Heart Attacks Compared to Older Arthritis Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (May 2006)
    New research published in the March 2006 edition of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine indicates that the popular arthritis and painkilling drug celecoxib (CELEBREX) may double the risk for heart attacks compared to older arthritis medications.
  • British To Ban The Combination Painkiller Containing Propoxyphene With Acetaminophen [hide all summaries]
    (April 2005)
    The decision to remove this drug from the market is based on the fact that it is a poor pain reliever and that the risk of toxicity in overdose, both accidental and deliberate, is unacceptable.
  • Cutting Your Drug Bill While Reducing Your Risk Of Avoidable Adverse Drug Reactions: Six Examples [hide all summaries]
    (February 2005)
    This article will look at the potential savings for the individual consumer if the alternative treatments recommended in Worst Pills, Best Pills were used for six DO NOT USE drugs. All six are listed in the Drug Topics Magazine Top 200 selling drugs in U.S. in 2003. The drugs are: celecoxib (CELEBREX) used for arthritis and pain; the Alzheimer’s disease drug donepezil (ARICEPT); drospirenone with ethinyl estradiol (YASMIN 28), an oral contraceptive; esomeprazole (NEXIUM) the “new purple pill” for heartburn; montelukast (SINGULAIR), a drug approved for both asthma and hay fever; and valdecoxib (BEXTRA), an arthritis drug very similar to celecoxib.The combined sales of these six DO NOT USE drugs was $8.1 billion with more that 75 million prescriptions dispensed in 2003.
  • Reporting Adverse Events With Drugs and Medical Devices to the Food and Drug Administration [hide all summaries]
    (January 2005)
    The FDA offers several ways for health professionals or consumers to submit MedWatch reports: Online — Go to the MedWatch Web site at www.fda.gov/medwatch/ and follow the instructions for submitting a report electronically By mail — Fill out and mail the MedWatch form on the next page to the FDA By phone — The toll-free number for reporting to the FDA is 1-800-FDA-1088
  • A Reminder About The Dangers Of Aspirin And Reye’s Syndrome [hide all summaries]
    (November 2003)
    Warnings: Reye’s syndrome: Children and teenagers should not use this medicine for chicken pox or flu symptoms before a doctor is consulted about Reye’s syndrome, a rare but serious illness reported to be associated with aspirin.

SHOW primary search results for acetaminophen (TYLENOL)

Copyright © 2017 Public Citizen's Health Research Group. All rights reserved. https://www.worstpills.org/