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Search Term: lithium (LITHOBID)


Drug Profiles | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • sibutramine (MERIDIA)
    We list this drug as a Do Not Use drug because it causes very limited weight loss and also causes high blood pressure and increased heart rate.

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Drug Mix-Ups [hide all summaries]
    (June 2011)
    This article lists 355 drugs with names that are often confused with similar-sounding drug names. Find out what you can do to prevent getting the wrong drug.
  • SSRIs Can Have Dangerous Interactions With Other Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2008)
    More than 70 million prescriptions a year are filled for these popular antidepressants, including Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Luvox, Celexa and Lexapro. This article gives details about more than 60 other widely prescribed prescription drugs that can have harmful interactions if used with these antidepressants. The two different kinds of interactions are also discussed.
  • Drug Interactions 101 [hide all summaries]
    (November 2007)
    This month marks the beginning of an important addition to every issue of Worst Pills, Best Pills News concerning drug interactions. The articles are being written by one of the world’s top authorities on interactions, Dr. Philip Hansten of the University of Washington. This introductory article explains how to understand different types of interactions and every month, starting now, there will be a specific article on the adverse interaction of the month.
  • Adverse Drug Reactions Cause 1.4 Million Emergency Room Visits in 2004 and 2005 [hide all summaries]
    (January 2007)
    An estimated 701,547 patients were treated for adverse drug reactions in emergency rooms each year in 2004 and 2005, totaling 1.4 million visits to the emergency room. Of these, an estimated 117,318 patients were hospitalized each year. According to the study. 18 drugs were each, either independently or in combination with other drugs, implicated in one percent or more of the estimated adverse drug events. These drugs are listed in the table that accompanies this article along with the annual estimates of adverse drug events.
  • The Serotonin Syndrome: A Potentially Life-Threatening Adverse Drug Reaction — Fluoxetine (PROZAC), Escitalopram (LEXAPRO), Sibutramine (MERIDIA) And Other Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (September 2003)
    Canadian drug regulatory authorities reviewed reported cases of serotonin syndrome in the July 2003 issue of the Canadian Adverse Reaction Newsletter. The serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction involving an excess of serotonin, a naturally occurring nerve transmitter.
  • Seizure Medication Lamotrigine (LAMICTAL) Approved For Use In Bipolar Disorder [hide all summaries]
    (August 2003)
    GlaxoSmithKline of Research Triangle Park, NC announced in June 2003 that their seizure medication lamotrigine (LAMICTAL) had been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder to delay the time to occurrence of mood episodes such as depression, mania (periods of severe highs), hypomania, or mixed episodes in patients also being treated with standard therapy. If you make the decision to use lamotrigine for bipolar I disorder and if a rash appears, report it to your physician immediately and the drug should be discontinued.
  • Oxybutynin Patches (OXYTROL): A Grossly Overpriced Product For Overactive Bladder [hide all summaries]
    (July 2003)
    You should check the list of drugs that can cause loss of bladder control before starting drug treatment for this condition. You may be able to change from a drug that causes loss of bladder control to a drug that does not or alter the dose. This may be enough to solve the problem.
  • Do Not Use! New Safety Warning Added to the Arthritis Drug Valdecoxib (BEXTRA) [hide all summaries]
    (January 2003)
    There is an additional similarity (aside from our listing both as DO NOT USE drugs) between valdecoxib and celecoxib, both are sulfa drugs and individuals who are allergic to sulfa drugs should not use them. Although celecoxib came on the market with a warning about sulfa drug allergy, valdecoxib did not. We previously wrote “It may be a dangerous oversight on the part of the FDA not to have required the same warning for valdecoxib.” Unfortunately, because uninformed patients have been needlessly harmed, our prediction has come to pass.
  • Review of Anti-Seizure Drugs For Bipolar Disorder [hide all summaries]
    (March 2001)
    The editors of the highly respected Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics, for doctors and pharmacists, reviewed evidence from controlled clinical trials of anti-seizure drugs for psychiatric disorders in the December 11, 2000 issue. Controlled clinical trials are the “gold standard” for testing the effectiveness of drugs.

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