Search Type: drug or dietary supplement name
Search Term: ibuprofen (ADVIL, CHILDREN’S ELIXSURE, IBU-TAB, IBU-TAB 200, IBUPROHM, MEDIPREN, MIDOL LIQUID GELS, MOTRIN, MOTRIN IB, NUPRIN, PROFEN, TAB-PROFEN)


Drug Profiles | Disease and Drug Family Information | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles | Additional Information from Public Citizen | Health Letter Articles

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Disease and Drug Family Information

Search results below include Disease and Drug Family Information where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Depression: When are Drugs Called For And Which Ones Should You Use? [hide all summaries]
    Ironically, one of the kinds of depression that should not be treated with drugs is depression caused by other kinds of drugs. If someone is depressed and the depression started after beginning a new drug, it may well be drug-caused. Commonly used drugs known to cause depression include the following:
  • Migraine Headaches [hide all summaries]
    For reasons of both safety and cost, the newer migraine drugs known as triptans should be used only after determining that the NSAIDs and acetaminophen fail to work. The triptans can dangerously, even fatally, narrow arteries in the heart.
  • Muscle Relaxants [hide all summaries]
    Some of the widely prescribed muscle relaxants covered on this web site have been on the market for more than 40 years. Yet five of these drugs were among the top 200 most frequently prescribed medications in the United States in 2002, with more than 30 million prescriptions dispensed. Since their original marketing, there has been very little reliable evidence that these drugs actually relax muscles.
  • Ulcers and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) [hide all summaries]
    There are nondrug treatments, with no safety concerns, and less expensive drugs that may be effective for GERD; these should be tried before you use any drugs for heartburn. First, try to avoid foods that trigger your condition (e.g., fatty foods, onions, caffeine, peppermint, and chocolate), and avoid alcohol, smoking, and tight clothing. Second, avoid food, and particularly alcohol, within two or three hours of bedtime. Third, elevate the head of the bed about six inches or sleep with extra pillows.

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Corticosteroid Injections Not Beneficial for Knee Osteoarthritis [hide all summaries]
    (November 2017)
    The injection of corticosteroids into the knee joints of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee is a widespread practice. Find out the results of new research funded by the National Institutes of Health showing that such injections actually may accelerate joint damage.
  • “Natural” Teething Remedies Also May Be Deadly [hide all summaries]
    (July 2017)
    Parents may be tempted to try assorted teething remedies for their infants. Learn about certain homeopathic products for teething that have been recalled because they were linked to a large number of serious injuries in infants.
  • Spironolactone: Review of a ‘Water Pill’ [hide all summaries]
    (March 2017)
    Spironolactone is a diuretic (water pill) that has been used for decades to treat certain patients with high blood pressure, heart failure, swelling (water retention) and other conditions. Find out who is most likely to benefit from using this drug and who should avoid it because of its dangerous adverse effects.
  • Questions & Answers [hide all summaries]
    (January 2016)
    In this month’s Questions & Answers feature, we address readers’ questions about using several non-traditional treatments for osteoarthritis pain, including cetyl myristoleate, s-adenosylmethionine or SAMe, and aloe vera.
  • Further Evidence That CELEBREX Is a Do Not Use Drug; New Designation of Diclofenac (VOLTAREN) as a Do Not Use Drug; and Other Do Not Use NSAIDS [hide all summaries]
    (June 2014)
    Learn about new research that provides further evidence affirming our designation of celecoxib (CE¬LEBREX) as a Do Not Use drug and that has prompted us to reclassify diclofenac (VOLTAREN) from Limited Use to Do Not Use. Also find out which NSAIDs are least likely to cause adverse cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks and strokes.
  • Steroid Injections and Other Treatments for Lower Back Pain [hide all summaries]
    (November 2012)
    The recent epidemic of life-threatening and fatal infections from contaminated spinal steroid injections is a reminder of the larger issue of their use, even if not contaminated. The article discusses risks that remain even with properly manufactured medications, describing how patients and physicians should know when not to use steroids, consider the risks and benefits of the procedure, and understand other treatment options before using steroids to treat lower back pain.
  • Risk of Bleeding and Use of Antidepressants After Heart Attack [hide all summaries]
    (March 2012)
    The article discusses why taking certain antidepressants after a heart attack may increase the risk of bleeding. Find out which ones are the culprits.
  • Drug Mix-Ups [hide all summaries]
    (June 2011)
    This article lists 355 drugs with names that are often confused with similar-sounding drug names. Find out what you can do to prevent getting the wrong drug.
  • Liver Toxicity With Topical Diclofenac Sodium (VOLTAREN) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2010)
    Although skin application of drugs usually results in lower blood levels than oral use, cases of liver toxicity have been found with topical diclofenac Sodium (VOLTAREN). The article lists other names of these products and explains the warning signals that may indicate liver toxicity.
  • Potassium Increases Due to Drug Interactions Can Be Dangerous [hide all summaries]
    (November 2008)
    One of the most common drug interactions occurs when patients take two or more drugs that can each increase blood potassium levels. The resulting condition, hyperkalemia (increased blood potassium levels), can cause nausea, fatigue, muscle weakness or tingling sensations, as well as heart abnormalities, showing up as an abnormal electrocardiogram. In some cases it can be fatal. The article lists 50 drugs which, especially when used in combination, can cause hyperkalemia.
  • Dangers of Mixing Alcohol with Certain Medications or Diseases [hide all summaries]
    (August 2008)
    The article discusses 273 drugs that can have harmful interactions with alcohol. Also reviewed are several ways in which these harmful interactions can occur: 1/ Medications Can Increase Alcohol Blood Levels 2/ Additive effects of medications and alcohol. One of the best- known drug-alcohol interactions is when alcohol, a depressant, is taken with other sedative medications, and excessive sedation or depression of respiration can occur 3/Alcohol can increase the blood levels of some medications leading to toxicity of these drugs. 4/ Alcohol also can reduce blood levels of some medications causing them to be less effective. Although some of the interactions between alcohol and medications mainly occur in people who drink heavily (three or more drinks on one occasion), many of these interactions may occur with much lower amounts of alcohol use, such as one to two drinks on an occasion. We strongly urge you to tell your physicians and other health care providers how much alcohol you are drinking so they can effectively assess the risks and advise you about the safe use of alcohol and medications.
  • Avoiding Overuse of Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2008)
    This article reviews evidence for the international epidemic of overuse of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), drugs used to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). There were 70 million prescriptions filled in U.S. pharmacies in 2006 for the four leading PPI drugs: esomeprazole (NEXIUM), lansoprazole (PREVACID), pantoprazole (PROTONIX) and rabeprazole (ACIPHIX). Find out about several serious side effects of these drugs such as increased community-acquired pneumonia, increased hip fractures and acute kidney inflammation. Learn about alternatives to using PPIs.
  • SSRIs Can Have Dangerous Interactions With Other Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2008)
    More than 70 million prescriptions a year are filled for these popular antidepressants, including Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Luvox, Celexa and Lexapro. This article gives details about more than 60 other widely prescribed prescription drugs that can have harmful interactions if used with these antidepressants. The two different kinds of interactions are also discussed.
  • Drug Interactions: Warfarin (COUMADIN) [hide all summaries]
    (December 2007)
    This article explains how to understand the International Normalized Ratio (INR), a test applied to a sample of a patient’s blood to determine how “thin” it is when you are using the blood thinner COUMADIN (warfarin). In addition, the article lists more than 50 drugs or dietary supplements that can interact harmfully with COUMADIN to cause the blood to be too thin (abnormal bleeding) or not thin enough which could result in lessening the effect of COUMADIN in stopping blood clot formation.
  • New European Warnings and Restrictions on Painkiller Piroxicam (FELDENE): FDA Fails to Issue New Warning [hide all summaries]
    (November 2007)
    The European Medicines Agency (EMEA) has issued new warnings for the painkiller/arthritis drug piroxicam (Feldene). The drug "was singled out for special review because piroxicam-containing medicines are associated with more gastro intestinal side effects and more serious skin reactions than other non-selective NSAIDs." In a series of published studies, in comparison to ibuprofen (ADVIL, MOTRIN), piroxicam was between 2.8 and 7.1 times more likely to be associated with severe gastrointestinal toxicity, defined as bleeding, ulceration or perforation. No other NSAID was as consistently as high in gastrointestinal risk as piroxicam. We continue to recommend that this uniquely dangerous drug be classified as Do Not Use.
  • Adverse Drug Reactions Cause 1.4 Million Emergency Room Visits in 2004 and 2005 [hide all summaries]
    (January 2007)
    An estimated 701,547 patients were treated for adverse drug reactions in emergency rooms each year in 2004 and 2005, totaling 1.4 million visits to the emergency room. Of these, an estimated 117,318 patients were hospitalized each year. According to the study. 18 drugs were each, either independently or in combination with other drugs, implicated in one percent or more of the estimated adverse drug events. These drugs are listed in the table that accompanies this article along with the annual estimates of adverse drug events.
  • Health Research Group Petitions to Phase Out the Sale of the Painkiller Propoxyphene (DARVON, DARVOCET, and Generic Versions) [hide all summaries]
    (June 2006)
    On Feb. 28, 2006, the Health Research Group petitioned the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to immediately begin phasing out the sale of the dangerous painkiller propoxyphene (DARVON). The reason for the petition is that propoxyphene has been associated with over 10,000 confirmed deaths and 2,110 reported accidental deaths in the U.S. from 1981 through 1999. There are many generic versions of propoxyphene on the market, as well as a number of products that combine propoxyphene with acetaminophen (TYLENOL). These products are sold as DARVOCET and are also widely sold as generic drugs. A phased withdrawal, instead of an immediate ban, is necessary because of the addicting properties of the drug and the need to switch patients to other painkillers.
  • Celecoxib (CELEBREX) May Double the Risk for Heart Attacks Compared to Older Arthritis Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (May 2006)
    New research published in the March 2006 edition of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine indicates that the popular arthritis and painkilling drug celecoxib (CELEBREX) may double the risk for heart attacks compared to older arthritis medications.
  • Glucosamine and Chondroitin for Knee Arthritis - Still No Evidence of Effectiveness [hide all summaries]
    (May 2006)
    In the most rigorous study to date, there was no evidence of effectiveness for glucosamine, chondroitin or the two together. We continue to recommend against the use of these unregulated supplements.
  • FDA Public Health Advisory - Arthritis Drug Valdecoxib (BEXTRA) Removed From Market; Major New Warnings for Other NSAIDs [hide all summaries]
    (June 2005)
    If you are currently taking celecoxib (CELEBREX)you should contact your physician to consider alternative NSAID treatment.
  • Problems With COX-2 Inhibitors Vault Meloxicam (MOBIC) To Blockbuster Status [hide all summaries]
    (March 2005)
    There is no medical reason why you should be taking meloxicam rather than an older, equally effective NSAID such as ibuprofen to manage arthritis.
  • Cutting Your Drug Bill While Reducing Your Risk Of Avoidable Adverse Drug Reactions: Six Examples [hide all summaries]
    (February 2005)
    This article will look at the potential savings for the individual consumer if the alternative treatments recommended in Worst Pills, Best Pills were used for six DO NOT USE drugs. All six are listed in the Drug Topics Magazine Top 200 selling drugs in U.S. in 2003. The drugs are: celecoxib (CELEBREX) used for arthritis and pain; the Alzheimer’s disease drug donepezil (ARICEPT); drospirenone with ethinyl estradiol (YASMIN 28), an oral contraceptive; esomeprazole (NEXIUM) the “new purple pill” for heartburn; montelukast (SINGULAIR), a drug approved for both asthma and hay fever; and valdecoxib (BEXTRA), an arthritis drug very similar to celecoxib.The combined sales of these six DO NOT USE drugs was $8.1 billion with more that 75 million prescriptions dispensed in 2003.
  • Blockbuster Arthritis Drug Rofecoxib (VIOXX) Withdrawn From Market [hide all summaries]
    (November 2004)
    Vioxx is the ninth prescription drug to be taken off the market in the past seven years that Worst Pills, Best Pills News readers were previously warned DO NOT USE. The average time between warning readers not to use these drugs and their removal from the market was one year and eight months.
  • Lawsuit Reveals Serious Safety Problems with the Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Valdecoxib (BEXTRA) [hide all summaries]
    (September 2004)
    Public Citizen filed suit in the District Court for the District of Columbia on February 25, 2004 against the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) asking that they make public complete copies of the agency’s scientific reviews of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) valdecoxib (BEXTRA).
  • Overdoses and Lung Toxicity With Methotrexate When Used for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Other Diseases [hide all summaries]
    (March 2003)
    The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), with the knowledge of the FDA, issued an alert about methotrexate overdoses that occur when the drug is incorrectly prescribed or used daily rather than weekly.
  • Do Not Use! New Safety Warning Added to the Arthritis Drug Valdecoxib (BEXTRA) [hide all summaries]
    (January 2003)
    There is an additional similarity (aside from our listing both as DO NOT USE drugs) between valdecoxib and celecoxib, both are sulfa drugs and individuals who are allergic to sulfa drugs should not use them. Although celecoxib came on the market with a warning about sulfa drug allergy, valdecoxib did not. We previously wrote “It may be a dangerous oversight on the part of the FDA not to have required the same warning for valdecoxib.” Unfortunately, because uninformed patients have been needlessly harmed, our prediction has come to pass.
  • Arthritis Drug Rofecoxib (VIOXX) Linked to Increased Risk of Coronary Heart Disease [hide all summaries]
    (December 2002)
    Investigators from Vanderbilt University in Nashville TN, in a study published in the October 5, 2002 issue of The Lancet, found that patients taking 50 milligrams per day of the arthritis and painkilling drug rofecoxib (VIOXX) for longer than five days are 70 percent more likely to develop coronary heart disease (CHD) than nonusers of the drug.

Additional Information from Public Citizen

Search results below include Additional Information from Public Citizen where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Health Letter Articles

Search results below include Health Letter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

SHOW primary search results for ibuprofen (ADVIL, CHILDREN’S ELIXSURE, IBU-TAB, IBU-TAB 200, IBUPROHM, MEDIPREN, MIDOL LIQUID GELS, MOTRIN, MOTRIN IB, NUPRIN, PROFEN, TAB-PROFEN)

Copyright © 2017 Public Citizen's Health Research Group. All rights reserved. https://www.worstpills.org/