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Search Term: furosemide (LASIX)


Disease and Drug Family Information | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Disease and Drug Family Information

Search results below include Disease and Drug Family Information where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Vitamins and Minerals [hide all summaries]
    One promotional strategy of supplement suppliers is to make people worry about whether they are getting enough nutrients. But do most people really need to take vitamins and minerals to supplement their diets? Or are they a waste of money? Are there better alternatives to taking supplements to ensure adequate nutrition? This section will attempt to answer these questions and help you sort through the fact and fiction surrounding nutritional supplements.

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • New Diabetes Drug Dapagliflozin (FARXIGA): Risks Outweigh Benefits [hide all summaries]
    (September 2014)
    Learn about the many dangers of one of the newest diabetes drugs approved in the U.S., dapagliflozin, which has been designated as Do Not Use by Public Citizen’s Health Research Group.
  • The New Diabetes Drug Canagliflozin (INVOKANA) [hide all summaries]
    (February 2014)
    Do not use the newly approved diabetes drug INVOKANA. It offers no benefits over existing drugs but can result in serious risks, including hypotension and impaired kidney function, outlined in the article.
  • Drug Mix-Ups [hide all summaries]
    (June 2011)
    This article lists 355 drugs with names that are often confused with similar-sounding drug names. Find out what you can do to prevent getting the wrong drug.
  • Weight-Loss Supplements Illegally Spiked with Prescription Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (May 2009)
    The article lists 72 weight loss dietary supplements that have recently been found to have been spiked with one of nine different prescription drugs, often at dangerously high concentrations. If you have used any products containing these ingredients, you should stop taking them and consult your health care professional immediately.
  • Potassium Increases Due to Drug Interactions Can Be Dangerous [hide all summaries]
    (November 2008)
    One of the most common drug interactions occurs when patients take two or more drugs that can each increase blood potassium levels. The resulting condition, hyperkalemia (increased blood potassium levels), can cause nausea, fatigue, muscle weakness or tingling sensations, as well as heart abnormalities, showing up as an abnormal electrocardiogram. In some cases it can be fatal. The article lists 50 drugs which, especially when used in combination, can cause hyperkalemia.
  • BIDIL, a Heart Drug Targeted at African Americans, Stirs Complex Controversy [hide all summaries]
    (September 2005)
    You should only be using BiDil for congestive heart failure in combination with other drugs for this condition. For one-fourth of the cost, with the cooperation of your physician, you can get prescriptions for the two generically-available drugs that comprise BiDil, isosorbide dinitrate and hydralazine.
  • Oxybutynin Patches (OXYTROL): A Grossly Overpriced Product For Overactive Bladder [hide all summaries]
    (July 2003)
    You should check the list of drugs that can cause loss of bladder control before starting drug treatment for this condition. You may be able to change from a drug that causes loss of bladder control to a drug that does not or alter the dose. This may be enough to solve the problem.
  • Do Not Use! New Safety Warning Added to the Arthritis Drug Valdecoxib (BEXTRA) [hide all summaries]
    (January 2003)
    There is an additional similarity (aside from our listing both as DO NOT USE drugs) between valdecoxib and celecoxib, both are sulfa drugs and individuals who are allergic to sulfa drugs should not use them. Although celecoxib came on the market with a warning about sulfa drug allergy, valdecoxib did not. We previously wrote “It may be a dangerous oversight on the part of the FDA not to have required the same warning for valdecoxib.” Unfortunately, because uninformed patients have been needlessly harmed, our prediction has come to pass.

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