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Search Term: clozapine (CLOZARIL, FAZACLO, FAZACLO ODT, VERSACLOZ)


Drug Profiles | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Inappropriate Prescribing of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in the Elderly: Inexcusable Deaths and Medicare Dollars Wasted [hide all summaries]
    (August 2011)
    Most prescriptions for antipsychotic drugs to people in nursing homes are inappropriate and quite dangerous. Find out what you can do to protect your family or friends.
  • Drug Mix-Ups [hide all summaries]
    (June 2011)
    This article lists 355 drugs with names that are often confused with similar-sounding drug names. Find out what you can do to prevent getting the wrong drug.
  • Dangers of Mixing Alcohol with Certain Medications or Diseases [hide all summaries]
    (August 2008)
    The article discusses 273 drugs that can have harmful interactions with alcohol. Also reviewed are several ways in which these harmful interactions can occur: 1/ Medications Can Increase Alcohol Blood Levels 2/ Additive effects of medications and alcohol. One of the best- known drug-alcohol interactions is when alcohol, a depressant, is taken with other sedative medications, and excessive sedation or depression of respiration can occur 3/Alcohol can increase the blood levels of some medications leading to toxicity of these drugs. 4/ Alcohol also can reduce blood levels of some medications causing them to be less effective. Although some of the interactions between alcohol and medications mainly occur in people who drink heavily (three or more drinks on one occasion), many of these interactions may occur with much lower amounts of alcohol use, such as one to two drinks on an occasion. We strongly urge you to tell your physicians and other health care providers how much alcohol you are drinking so they can effectively assess the risks and advise you about the safe use of alcohol and medications.
  • Macrolide Antibiotic Drug Interactions [hide all summaries]
    (February 2008)
    The article discusses the adverse drug interactions between either of two widely-prescribed macrolide antibiotics, erythromycin (as in ERYTHROCIN) and clarithromycin (BIAXIN)and more than 40 other drugs that are listed in a table in the article. It also describes the nature of the adverse interactions that can occur.
  • SSRIs Can Have Dangerous Interactions With Other Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2008)
    More than 70 million prescriptions a year are filled for these popular antidepressants, including Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, Luvox, Celexa and Lexapro. This article gives details about more than 60 other widely prescribed prescription drugs that can have harmful interactions if used with these antidepressants. The two different kinds of interactions are also discussed.
  • The Newer Atypical Antipsychotic Drug Olanzapine (ZYPREXA) Shows No Advantage Over Haloperidol (HALDOL) [hide all summaries]
    (May 2004)
    A randomized controlled clinical trial, the “gold standard” for scientific research, published in the November 26, 2003 Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) compared the newer top selling atypical antipsychotic drug olanzapine (ZYPREXA) to the much older antipsychotic agent haloperidol (HALDOL) and concluded that this trial: "...found no statistically or clinically significant advantages of olanzapine for schizophrenia on measures of compliance, symptoms, or overall quality of life, nor did it find evidence of reduced inpatient use or total cost."
  • The Serotonin Syndrome: A Potentially Life-Threatening Adverse Drug Reaction — Fluoxetine (PROZAC), Escitalopram (LEXAPRO), Sibutramine (MERIDIA) And Other Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (September 2003)
    Canadian drug regulatory authorities reviewed reported cases of serotonin syndrome in the July 2003 issue of the Canadian Adverse Reaction Newsletter. The serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction involving an excess of serotonin, a naturally occurring nerve transmitter.
  • Oxybutynin Patches (OXYTROL): A Grossly Overpriced Product For Overactive Bladder [hide all summaries]
    (July 2003)
    You should check the list of drugs that can cause loss of bladder control before starting drug treatment for this condition. You may be able to change from a drug that causes loss of bladder control to a drug that does not or alter the dose. This may be enough to solve the problem.
  • NEW WARNING! Risk Of Stroke When The Antipsychotic Risperidone (RISPERDAL) Is Prescribed For Dementia [hide all summaries]
    (June 2003)
    The manufacturer of the antipsychotic drug risperidone (RISPERDAL), announced on April 16, 2003, that an important new warning had been added to the professional product labeling, or package insert, for the drug concerning cerebrovascular adverse effects, including stroke and transient ischemic attack (temporary reduction of blood flow to the head), when the drug is used to treat elderly patients for dementia. In some of these cases the result was death.
  • Do Not Use Until December 2009 The New Antipsychotic Drug Aripiprazole (ABILIFY) [hide all summaries]
    (June 2003)
    You should follow the Health Research Group’s Seven Year Rule with aripiprazole. There is no evidence to suggest that aripiprazole is a “breakthrough” drug.

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