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Search Term: cimetidine (TAGAMET, TAGAMET HB)


Drug Profiles | Disease and Drug Family Information | Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Drug and Dietary Supplement Profiles

A comprehensive review of the safety and effectiveness of this drug. If the drug is not a Do Not Use product, information on adverse effects, drug interactions and how to use the medication are included.
Search results below include drug profiles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion

Disease and Drug Family Information

Search results below include Disease and Drug Family Information where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • Antipsychotic Drugs: Dangerously Overused [hide all summaries]
    Antipsychotic drugs, also called neuroleptic drugs or major tranquilizers, are properly and successfully used to treat serious psychotic mental disorders, the most common of which is schizophrenia. In younger adults, an alarming number of those with schizophrenia who could and often have previously benefited from antipsychotic drugs are not receiving them. They are seen, among other places, on the streets and in homeless shelters. In older adults, the problem is not underuse but, rather, gross overuse by people who are not psychotic.
  • Depression: When are Drugs Called For And Which Ones Should You Use? [hide all summaries]
    Ironically, one of the kinds of depression that should not be treated with drugs is depression caused by other kinds of drugs. If someone is depressed and the depression started after beginning a new drug, it may well be drug-caused. Commonly used drugs known to cause depression include the following:

Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a secondary subject of discussion
  • FDA Warning: Commonly Used Diarrhea Drug Can Cause Life-Threatening Heart Problems [hide all summaries]
    (May 2017)
    Find out which commonly used prescription and over-the-counter diarrhea medications can cause dangerous abnormal heart rhythms and cardiac arrest if taken at higher-than-recommended doses.
  • Important Information to Know About Clopidogrel [hide all summaries]
    (June 2014)
    Clopidogrel is a widely used drug for reducing the risk of a new heart attack or stroke or cardiovascular death in patients who have had a recent heart attack, stroke or established pe-ripheral vascular disease. This article provides a detailed overview of the drug, including potential serious side effects and important precautions to follow when taking the drug.
  • Inadvertent Adverse Reactions With Commonly Used Drugs [hide all summaries]
    (January 2012)
    Find out how to prevent emergency hospitalizations from two commonly used drugs, warfarin (COUMADIN) and clopidogrel (PLAVIX). There are approximately 33,000 emergency hospitalizations a year from warfarin alone. This article includes a list of more than 50 drugs that can have harmful interactions with warfarin and/or clopidogrel.
  • Massive Misprescribing of Inappropriate Drugs to Hospitalized Elderly Patients [hide all summaries]
    (September 2008)
    A nationwide study published in spring 2008 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine showed that nearly half (49 percent) of almost 500,000 hospital patients older than 65 have been prescribed one or more of 92 drugs known to be unnecessarily unsafe for older patients. 10,000 of these patients had four or more of these inappropriate medicines prescribed during their hospitalization. Among the most common categories of adverse drug reactions these inappropriately prescribed drugs can cause are excessive sedation, abnormally low blood pressure and bleeding. We list the 92 drugs in the article and give further details about the kinds of side effects these drugs can cause.
  • Dangers of Mixing Alcohol with Certain Medications or Diseases [hide all summaries]
    (August 2008)
    The article discusses 273 drugs that can have harmful interactions with alcohol. Also reviewed are several ways in which these harmful interactions can occur: 1/ Medications Can Increase Alcohol Blood Levels 2/ Additive effects of medications and alcohol. One of the best- known drug-alcohol interactions is when alcohol, a depressant, is taken with other sedative medications, and excessive sedation or depression of respiration can occur 3/Alcohol can increase the blood levels of some medications leading to toxicity of these drugs. 4/ Alcohol also can reduce blood levels of some medications causing them to be less effective. Although some of the interactions between alcohol and medications mainly occur in people who drink heavily (three or more drinks on one occasion), many of these interactions may occur with much lower amounts of alcohol use, such as one to two drinks on an occasion. We strongly urge you to tell your physicians and other health care providers how much alcohol you are drinking so they can effectively assess the risks and advise you about the safe use of alcohol and medications.
  • Avoiding Overuse of Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) [hide all summaries]
    (March 2008)
    This article reviews evidence for the international epidemic of overuse of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), drugs used to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). There were 70 million prescriptions filled in U.S. pharmacies in 2006 for the four leading PPI drugs: esomeprazole (NEXIUM), lansoprazole (PREVACID), pantoprazole (PROTONIX) and rabeprazole (ACIPHIX). Find out about several serious side effects of these drugs such as increased community-acquired pneumonia, increased hip fractures and acute kidney inflammation. Learn about alternatives to using PPIs.
  • Drug Interactions: Warfarin (COUMADIN) [hide all summaries]
    (December 2007)
    This article explains how to understand the International Normalized Ratio (INR), a test applied to a sample of a patient’s blood to determine how “thin” it is when you are using the blood thinner COUMADIN (warfarin). In addition, the article lists more than 50 drugs or dietary supplements that can interact harmfully with COUMADIN to cause the blood to be too thin (abnormal bleeding) or not thin enough which could result in lessening the effect of COUMADIN in stopping blood clot formation.
  • REMINDER —The Heartburn Drug Metoclopramide (REGLAN) Can Cause Drug-Induced Movement Disorders [hide all summaries]
    (May 2005)
    The use of the heartburn drug metoclopramide (REGLAN) is increasing and that this fact may result in more cases of drug-induced movement disorders from metoclopramide (Reglan)that in some cases mimic Parkinson. If you or a family member are taking metoclopramide and uncontrollable movements develop, contact the prescribing physician immediately.
  • FDA-Approved Patient Information For The Heart Drug Amiodarone (CORDARONE) — A Last Choice Drug For Life-Threatening Heart Rhythm Disturbances [hide all summaries]
    (April 2005)
    Amiodarone has several potentially fatal toxicities, the most important of which is lung toxicity. This has resulted in clinically manifest disease at rates as high as 10 to 17 percent in some series of patients. This type of lung toxicity has been fatal about 10 percent of the time.
  • Cutting Your Drug Bill While Reducing Your Risk Of Avoidable Adverse Drug Reactions: Six Examples [hide all summaries]
    (February 2005)
    This article will look at the potential savings for the individual consumer if the alternative treatments recommended in Worst Pills, Best Pills were used for six DO NOT USE drugs. All six are listed in the Drug Topics Magazine Top 200 selling drugs in U.S. in 2003. The drugs are: celecoxib (CELEBREX) used for arthritis and pain; the Alzheimer’s disease drug donepezil (ARICEPT); drospirenone with ethinyl estradiol (YASMIN 28), an oral contraceptive; esomeprazole (NEXIUM) the “new purple pill” for heartburn; montelukast (SINGULAIR), a drug approved for both asthma and hay fever; and valdecoxib (BEXTRA), an arthritis drug very similar to celecoxib.The combined sales of these six DO NOT USE drugs was $8.1 billion with more that 75 million prescriptions dispensed in 2003.
  • Over-The-Counter Omeprazole (PRILOSEC OTC) — There Are Better Choices For Heartburn [hide all summaries]
    (October 2003)
    You should try the non-pharmacologic interventions listed in the box below before trying antacids, histamine-2 blockers, or, as a last resort, proton pump inhibitors. If you classify yourself as a person with frequent heartburn, that is heartburn more than two days per week, and the interventions recommended above have failed, you should be under the care of a physician
  • Calcium By Any Other Name is Still Calcium [hide all summaries]
    (May 2003)
    The jackals selling unregulated dietary and herbal supplements have been hard at it bombarding the public with preposterous, unsubstantiated claims about the superiority of their particular miracle natural calcium products. Some disreputable companies have gone beyond just claiming a better calcium product and are now declaring that “coral calcium,” for example if it is from Okinawa, is the secret to good health and a long life.

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